Talk To Me In Korean
The key to learning Korean is staying motivated enough to learn the language. At TalkToMeInKorean.com, we provide you free lessons, fun video shows, and a store section that will keep you motivated and meet your Korean learning needs.

We say sentences like “I met my friends and hung out.” and “I want to go home and just sleep.” all the time. The simplest way to link two actions side by side is using the suffix -고, but sometimes just using -고 is not enough. This lesson will explain how to properly use -고 and -아/어/여서 to naturally express multiple actions that are linked and listed together in one sentence.

Direct download: How_to_list_multiple_actions_in_Korean.mp4
Category:general -- posted at: 7:00am JST

Many Korean verbs have multiple meanings and usages, and 먹다 is no exception. In this video lesson by Talk To Me In Korean, you can learn how to use 먹다 in various contexts through realistic sample sentences.
 
Examples:
밥을 먹다 eat a meal
약을 먹다 take medicine
과자를 먹다 eat snacks
 
밥 먹었어요? Have you eaten?
약 먹어요. Take medicine.
과자 먹을 거예요. I am going to eat snacks.
 
마음 먹었어요. I made up my mind.
독하게 마음 먹어요. Steel yourself. (Make up your mind with a firm resolve.)
독하게 마음 먹을 거예요. I will steel myself.
 
나이를 먹다 to age, to get older
저 나이 정말 많이 먹었어요. I’ve gotten quite old.
네 살 먹은 아이예요. He/she is a four-year-old kid.
Direct download: Has_Multiple_Meanings_1.mp4
Category:general -- posted at: 7:00am JST

There are many words in English that can be translated into various ways in Korean, so if you just stick to using one translation you found in a dictionary or in a machine translation service, it might lead to a confusing conversation. In this series with Jooyeon and Cassie, you can learn about English words that can be translated into many different phrases depending on the context. In today’s episode, let’s learn how to naturally say “upset” in Korean. 

 

Direct download: The_awkward_way_to_say_worth__in_Korean.mp4
Category:general -- posted at: 7:00am JST

Have you ever wondered why Koreans use social titles even among close family members, calling someone “so-and-so’s father” instead of saying their first name? This phenomenon can be found in other cultures, too, but perhaps this happens more frequently in Korean. There are three possible reasons for this: 1) Literally saying “you” can be more tricky and awkward in Korean if you are speaking formal language. 2) Just using the same title over and over again in many sentences in a row doesn’t bother most people. 3) To an extent, It shows on what the relationship is based and where it was formed. 

Direct download: When_Your_First_Name_Is_Not_Used_In_Korea_1.mp4
Category:general -- posted at: 7:00am JST

Many Korean verbs have multiple meanings and usages, and 시키다 is no exception. In this video lesson by Talk To Me In Korean, you can learn how to use 시키다 in various contexts through realistic sample sentences.
 
Examples: 
피자를 시키다 to order pizza
짜장면을 시키다 to order black bean noodles
도시락을 시키다 to order a lunchbox
아까 피자를 시켰어요. I ordered pizza earlier.
지금 피자를 시켜요. I order pizza now.
 
청소를 시키다 to have (someone) clean
심부름을 시키다 to have (someone) do errands
아까 선생님이 청소를 시켰어요. Earlier my teacher had me clean.
선생님이 청소를 시켜요. My teacher has me clean.
이따가 선생님이 청소를 시킬 거예요. Later, my teacher will have me clean.
Direct download: Has_Multiple_Meanings.mp4
Category:general -- posted at: 7:00am JST

Different countries have different school systems, so it is natural that school life can be different from country to country as well. What are some unique traits of Korean school life and American school life? Kyung-hwa, Cassie, and Jooyeon sat down to talk about this topic in all Korean. The video is only hard-subbed in Korean for your maximum listening practice, but if you want to participate in subtitle translation, you can do so at https://goo.gl/JdHJb3


In this week’s Situational Korean Quiz video, you will see two people interacting in Korean when they bump into each other in the street. Check if you can find the most natural Korean phrase for each situation.

Direct download: Situational_Korean_Quiz_-_Bumping_Into_an_Acquaintance_28_29.mp4
Category:general -- posted at: 7:00am JST

In today’s Korean Q&A video, Hyunwoo will introduce and explain the differences between various Korean verbs that can be translated to “to look” or “to watch” in English. Watch the lesson to check if you can use these words in real-life situations. We hope you enjoy this lesson and let us know if you have any other questions! 
 
 
Direct download: 17_different_ways_to_say_to_look-watch_in_Korean_-_Korean_Q26A.mp4
Category:general -- posted at: 7:00am JST

You can learn a lot of new Korean words very quickly by learning new Hanja, which are Chinese characters used in the Korean language. Through this video series, we will introduce one Hanja character at a time and show you how Hanja can help you understand new words you encounter in Korean!

Get your own copy of Your First Hanja Guide
Direct download: The_Korean_Jigsaw_Puzzle-_Hanja_2310_-_28_3D_to_eat29.mp4
Category:general -- posted at: 7:00am JST

Here is this week’s Korean dictation test for you! Listen carefully to what you hear in the video and see if you can write everything down. We have easy, normal and hard questions in one video.
 
Download our free printable PDF that accompanies this series:
Direct download: Korean_Dictation_Test_2312_28_Easy_-_Normal_-_Hard_29.mp4
Category:general -- posted at: 7:00am JST