Talk To Me In Korean
The key to learning Korean is staying motivated enough to learn the language. At TalkToMeInKorean.com, we provide you free lessons, fun video shows, and a store section that will keep you motivated and meet your Korean learning needs.

TTMIK Han River Talk

In this Han River Talk video, 석진, 경화 and 효진 went to the bridge between the 선유도 공원 (Seon-yu-do Park) and the 선유도 공원 subway station. Have you been to a park by the Han River? If so, which one have you been to? Also in your opinion, when is the best season for visiting Korea?

Direct download: TTMIK_Han_River_Talk.mp4
Category:general -- posted at: 7:26pm JST

TTMIK Level 6 Lesson 24 - PDF

When you want to emphasize an action or state in English, you either do it by adding more stress to the verb in the intonation, or by adding the word "do" in front of the verb.

Example #1
A: It's not easy.
B: No, it IS easy!

Example #2
A: Why did you not go there?
B: I DID go, but I came back early.

Example #3
A: Do you think you can do it?
B: Well, I COULD do it, but I don't want to do it.

Now in this lesson, let us take a look at how to express these in Korean.

The simplest way to do this is by changing the intonation.

A: 왜 안 했어요? [wae an hae-sseo-yo?] = Why didn't you do it?
B: 했어요! [hae-sseo-yo!] = I DID do it!

The above is when you are simply disagreeing with the other person and presenting a different fact.

But if you want to add some conditions or premises to your sentence and say “I did do it, but...” or “I do like it, but...” you need to use a different verb ending.

Example #1
A: So you didn’t even do it?
B: I did!! I DID do it, but I had some help.

Example #2
A: Can you do it?
B: I COULD do it, but I don’t want to do it.

Now let’s look at how to express these in Korean.

The key is “-기는”. This is the noun form -기 plus the topic marker -는. The topic marker is used to show contrast.

Example #1
갔어요. [ga-sseo-yo.] = I went (there).
→ 가기는 갔어요. [ga-gi-neun ga-sseo-yo.] = I DID go (there) but...
→ 가기는 했어요. [ga-gi-neun hae-sseo-yo.] = I DID go (there) but...
→ 가기는 갔는데, 일찍 왔어요. [ga-gi-neun gat-neun-de, il-jjik wa-sseo-yo.] = I DID go there, but I came back early.
→ 가기는 갈 거예요. [ga-gi-neun gal geo-ye-yo.] = I WILL go, but … ( + other premises )

Example #2
봤어요. [bwa-sseo-yo.] = I saw (it).
→ 보기는 봤어요. [bo-gi-neun bwa-sseo-yo.] = I DID see (it) but ...
→ 보기는 했어요. [bo-gi-neun hae-sseo-yo.] = I DID see (it) but …
→ 보기는 봤는데 기억이 안 나요. [bo-gi-neun bwat-neun-de gi-eo-gi an-na-yo.] = I DID see it, but I don’t remember.

How to say “I COULD do it but ...”
To say that you can do something, you use the structure, -(으)ㄹ 수 있다. And since here, -(으)ㄹ 수 is a NOUN GROUP that literally means “a method for doing something” or “possibility/ability”, you can JUST use the topic marker without having to change it again into the noun form. It’s already a noun.

Example
할 수 있어요. [hal su i-sseo-yo.] = I can do (it).
→ 할 수는 있어요. [hal su-neun i-sseo-yo.] = I COULD do it, but …
→ 할 수는 있는데, 안 하고 싶어요. [hal su-neun it-neun-de, an ha-go si-peo-yo.] = I COULD do it, but I don’t want to.
→ 할 수는 있는데, 조건이 있어요. [hal su-neun it-neun-de, jo-geo-ni i-sseo-yo.] = I COULD do it, but there’s a condition.

More Sample Sentences
1. 어제 친구를 만나기는 했는데, 금방 헤어졌어요.
[eo-je chin-gu-reul man-na-gi-neun haet-neun-de, geum-bang he-eo-jyeo-sseo-yo.]
= I DID meet a friend yesterday, but we parted soon.

2. 시간 맞춰서 도착하기는 했는데, 준비를 못 했어요.
[si-gan mat-chwo-seo do-cha-ka-gi-neun haet-neun-de, jun-bi-reul mot hae-sseo-yo.]
= I DID manage to get there on time, but I couldn’t prepare.

3. 읽기는 읽었는데 이해가 안 돼요.
[il-gi-neun il-geot-neun-de i-hae-ga an dwae-yo.]
= I DID read it, but I don’t understand it.

4. 좋기는 좋은데, 너무 비싸요.
[jo-ki-neun jo-eun-de, neo-mu bi-ssa-yo.]
= It IS good, but it’s too expensive.

5. 맛있기는 맛있는데, 좀 짜요.
[ma-sit-gi-neun ma-sit-neun-de, jom jja-yo.]
= It IS delicious, but it’s a bit salty.

Direct download: ttmik-l6l24.pdf
Category:PDF -- posted at: 6:36pm JST

TTMIK Level 6 Lesson 24


When you want to emphasize an action or state in English, you either do it by adding more stress to the verb in the intonation, or by adding the word "do" in front of the verb.

Example #1
A: It's not easy.
B: No, it IS easy!

Example #2
A: Why did you not go there?
B: I DID go, but I came back early.

Example #3
A: Do you think you can do it?
B: Well, I COULD do it, but I don't want to do it.

Now in this lesson, let us take a look at how to express these in Korean.

The simplest way to do this is by changing the intonation.

A: 왜 안 했어요? [wae an hae-sseo-yo?] = Why didn't you do it?
B: 했어요! [hae-sseo-yo!] = I DID do it!

The above is when you are simply disagreeing with the other person and presenting a different fact.

But if you want to add some conditions or premises to your sentence and say “I did do it, but...” or “I do like it, but...” you need to use a different verb ending.

Example #1
A: So you didn’t even do it?
B: I did!! I DID do it, but I had some help.

Example #2
A: Can you do it?
B: I COULD do it, but I don’t want to do it.

Now let’s look at how to express these in Korean.

The key is “-기는”. This is the noun form -기 plus the topic marker -는. The topic marker is used to show contrast.

Example #1
갔어요. [ga-sseo-yo.] = I went (there).
→ 가기는 갔어요. [ga-gi-neun ga-sseo-yo.] = I DID go (there) but...
→ 가기는 했어요. [ga-gi-neun hae-sseo-yo.] = I DID go (there) but...
→ 가기는 갔는데, 일찍 왔어요. [ga-gi-neun gat-neun-de, il-jjik wa-sseo-yo.] = I DID go there, but I came back early.
→ 가기는 갈 거예요. [ga-gi-neun gal geo-ye-yo.] = I WILL go, but … ( + other premises )

Example #2
봤어요. [bwa-sseo-yo.] = I saw (it).
→ 보기는 봤어요. [bo-gi-neun bwa-sseo-yo.] = I DID see (it) but ...
→ 보기는 했어요. [bo-gi-neun hae-sseo-yo.] = I DID see (it) but …
→ 보기는 봤는데 기억이 안 나요. [bo-gi-neun bwat-neun-de gi-eo-gi an-na-yo.] = I DID see it, but I don’t remember.

How to say “I COULD do it but ...”
To say that you can do something, you use the structure, -(으)ㄹ 수 있다. And since here, -(으)ㄹ 수 is a NOUN GROUP that literally means “a method for doing something” or “possibility/ability”, you can JUST use the topic marker without having to change it again into the noun form. It’s already a noun.

Example
할 수 있어요. [hal su i-sseo-yo.] = I can do (it).
→ 할 수는 있어요. [hal su-neun i-sseo-yo.] = I COULD do it, but …
→ 할 수는 있는데, 안 하고 싶어요. [hal su-neun it-neun-de, an ha-go si-peo-yo.] = I COULD do it, but I don’t want to.
→ 할 수는 있는데, 조건이 있어요. [hal su-neun it-neun-de, jo-geo-ni i-sseo-yo.] = I COULD do it, but there’s a condition.

More Sample Sentences
1. 어제 친구를 만나기는 했는데, 금방 헤어졌어요.
[eo-je chin-gu-reul man-na-gi-neun haet-neun-de, geum-bang he-eo-jyeo-sseo-yo.]
= I DID meet a friend yesterday, but we parted soon.

2. 시간 맞춰서 도착하기는 했는데, 준비를 못 했어요.
[si-gan mat-chwo-seo do-cha-ka-gi-neun haet-neun-de, jun-bi-reul mot hae-sseo-yo.]
= I DID manage to get there on time, but I couldn’t prepare.

3. 읽기는 읽었는데 이해가 안 돼요.
[il-gi-neun il-geot-neun-de i-hae-ga an dwae-yo.]
= I DID read it, but I don’t understand it.

4. 좋기는 좋은데, 너무 비싸요.
[jo-ki-neun jo-eun-de, neo-mu bi-ssa-yo.]
= It IS good, but it’s too expensive.

5. 맛있기는 맛있는데, 좀 짜요.
[ma-sit-gi-neun ma-sit-neun-de, jom jja-yo.]
= It IS delicious, but it’s a bit salty.

Direct download: ttmik-l6l24.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:33pm JST

Want to Have a Korean Name?

If you've always wanted to have a Korean name, this is your chance to get one!

You have until the 3rd of October, 2011 to post a video response to this video.

In the video response, make sure you pronounce your name clearly, and also include the spelling of your name both in your language and in the Alphabet.

We will choose a name that either sounds similar to your original name or suits your overall image and give it to you.

Your Korean names will be posted on our site at http://TalkToMeInKorean.com on the 9th of October, 2011, which is the Hangeul Day (한글날).

Thank you sooooo much for always being AWESOME and studying Korean with us!!

http://TalkToMeInKorean.com
http://MyKoreanStore.com

Direct download: 2011hangeuldayevent.mp4
Category:general -- posted at: 5:15pm JST

TTMIK Iyagi #77 - PDF

경화: 안녕하세요. Talk To Me In Korean의 이야기입니다.

석진: 안녕하세요. 경화 씨.

경화: 안녕하세요. 석진 오빠.

석진: 안녕하세요. 여러분.

경화: 안녕하세요. 여러분.

석진: 경화 씨. (네.) 오늘은 특별히 제가 경화 씨를 초대한 게 (네.) 이번 주제가 재밌기 때문이에요. 저는 경화 씨 되게 재밌는 사람이라고 생각했거든요. (네.) 경화 씨는 본인이 재밌다고 생각하세요?

경화: 남을 웃기는 사람은 아닌데, 잘 웃는 사람이라고 생각해요.

석진: 잘 웃는 사람이요?

경화: 네.

석진: 그렇구나. 이번 주제가 유행어예요.

경화: 네.

석진: 유행어 많이 써 보셨어요?

경화: 제가 써 보기 보다는 친구들이 따라할 때 많이 웃었죠.

석진: 주로 웃는 스타일이구나. (네.) 웃기는 그런 사람은 아니고?

경화: 네. 그래서 재밌는 사람을 좋아해요.

석진: 그렇구나. 경화 씨처럼 이제 자주 웃는 사람도 있겠지만, 그냥 여러 친구들 만날 때 안 웃는 사람도 있잖아요.

경화: 맞아요.

석진: 그런 사람들을 웃기려면 여러 방법이 있겠는데, 유행어를 많이 아는 것도 되게 좋은 방법이에요.

경화: 맞아요.

석진: 저는 한국어를 공부하는 외국인들이 이 점을 꼭 알았으면 좋겠어요.

경화: 어떤 점이요?

석진: 유행어를 많이 알면 인기가 많아지고, (맞아요.) 한국 사람들이 너무 좋아해요.

경화: 맞아요. 그래서 개그 프로그램을 많이 봐야 돼요.

석진: 맞아요. 맞아요. “개콘”이라든지, “개그 콘서트” 뭐 그런 프로그램 많죠.

경화: 네. 저는 “개그 콘서트” 굉장히 좋아해요.

석진: 매주 봐요?

경화: 거의 매주 봐요. 동생이, 못 보면 따로 다운 받아 줘요.

석진: 다운로드?

경화: 네.

석진: 아! 혹시 생각나는 유행어 있어요?

경화: “스타가 되고 싶으면 연락해!”

석진: “스타가 되고 싶으면 연락해!”

경화: 그거 너무 재밌었어요. 왜냐하면 그게 전라도 사투리여서 더 친숙해서 더 재밌었어요.

석진: 경화 씨, 고향이...?

경화: 네. 전라도예요.

석진: 전라도!

경화: 네. 저희 어머니도 그래서 굉장히 좋아했어요. 그 유행어.

석진: 그랬구나. 그리고 유행어를 잘 모르면 왠지 “제 또래들보다 좀 뒤쳐진다”는 그런 느낌도 들긴 해요.

경화: 네. 맞아요.

석진: 다른 사람들이 그런 유행어를 하면서 막 웃고 있는데 저 혼자 모르면 상당히 제가 시대에 뒤쳐지는 사람, 아니면 뭐 재미가 없는 사람처럼 느껴졌었어요.

경화: 네. 저도 한동안 개그 콘서트 안 봤거든요. 그런데 요즘에 사투리 쓰는 사람이 표준어 쓰는 것처럼 하는 거 다들 따라 하길래, 저도 챙겨 봤어요. 일부러.

석진: 혹시 그것도 유행어 있어요?

경화: 네. “서울말은 끝만 올리면 되는 거니? 아니, 가끔은 내릴 때도 있어.”

석진: 경화 씨 되게 재밌는데요?

경화: 저 따라하는 거 좋아하는데 별로 제가 하면 사람들이 안 웃더라고요.

석진: 그래도 재밌었어요. 그런데 그건 경상도 사투리를 하는 사람이 해야 더 재밌어요.

경화: 네. 그럼 해 주세요.

석진: “서울말은 끝만 올리면 된다면서?!”

경화: 진짜 허경환하고 비슷하네요.

석진: 네. 허경환이 그 개그 프로에 나오는 그 주인공이죠. (네.) 맞아요. 그리고 또 주의해야 할 점이 있어요. 좀 오래된 유행어를 하면 또 재미없는 사람이 될 수도 있어요.

경화: 아! 네. 맞아요.

석진: 옛날에 “여보세요?” 이 말로 정말 많은 사람들을 웃겼어요. (네.) 되게 크게 유행을 했었는데, 만약에 지금 친구가 전화를 걸었는데, 제가 전화를 받으면서 “여보세요?”하면 되게 싫어할 거예요.

경화: 네. 저도 그 유행어가 굉장히 유행했었다는 사실은 기억하는데, 그걸 지금 들으면 전혀 왜 웃긴지 모르겠어요.

석진: 네. 조심해야 돼요. 그래서 항상 TV를 자주 보는 게 중요하고요. (네.) 이미 지나간 유행어는 안 쓰는 게 (네, 맞아요.) 더 좋을 것 같아요.

경화: 유행어. 말 그대로 유행어니까, 그 때 유행하는 유행어를 써 줘야 돼요. 그래야 웃길 수 있어요.

석진: 해외에는 어떤 유행어가 있는지 되게 궁금해요.

경화: 해외에서 유행어 쓰는 거는 상상이 안 돼요. (그렇죠. 그렇죠.) 네. 외국어로 유행어가 있는 건 상상이 안돼요.

석진: 그래도 저희 TTMIK listener들이, TTMIK 청취자 분들이 아마 써 주실 거예요. 댓글로.

경화: 궁금해요. 알려 주세요.

석진: 지금까지 저와 경화 씨가 유행어에 대해서 이야기를 해 봤는데요. 아까 전에 말 했던 것처럼 외국에도 어떤 유행어가 있는지 되게 궁금해요. 그런 유행어가 있다면 댓글로 써 주시고요. 한국에 있는 어떤 유행어를 또 알고 있는지 그것도 알려 주시면 감사하겠습니다.

경화: 네. 외국인이 들으면 어떤 유행어가 웃긴지 궁금하니까 알려 주세요.

석진: 네. 꼭 코멘트 남겨 주세요. 그리고 마치기 전에 저희 재밌는 유행어 하나 하고 끝내죠. 저부터 할까요? “김 기사~ 운전해~”

경화: 저도 그럼 옛날 걸로. “별들에게 물어 봐!”

석진: 아, 재미없다.

Direct download: iyagi-77.pdf
Category:PDF -- posted at: 3:13pm JST

TTMIK Iyagi #77

경화: 안녕하세요. Talk To Me In Korean의 이야기입니다.

석진: 안녕하세요. 경화 씨.

경화: 안녕하세요. 석진 오빠.

석진: 안녕하세요. 여러분.

경화: 안녕하세요. 여러분.

석진: 경화 씨. (네.) 오늘은 특별히 제가 경화 씨를 초대한 게 (네.) 이번 주제가 재밌기 때문이에요. 저는 경화 씨 되게 재밌는 사람이라고 생각했거든요. (네.) 경화 씨는 본인이 재밌다고 생각하세요?

경화: 남을 웃기는 사람은 아닌데, 잘 웃는 사람이라고 생각해요.

석진: 잘 웃는 사람이요?

경화: 네.

석진: 그렇구나. 이번 주제가 유행어예요.

경화: 네.

석진: 유행어 많이 써 보셨어요?

경화: 제가 써 보기 보다는 친구들이 따라할 때 많이 웃었죠.

석진: 주로 웃는 스타일이구나. (네.) 웃기는 그런 사람은 아니고?

경화: 네. 그래서 재밌는 사람을 좋아해요.

석진: 그렇구나. 경화 씨처럼 이제 자주 웃는 사람도 있겠지만, 그냥 여러 친구들 만날 때 안 웃는 사람도 있잖아요.

경화: 맞아요.

석진: 그런 사람들을 웃기려면 여러 방법이 있겠는데, 유행어를 많이 아는 것도 되게 좋은 방법이에요.

경화: 맞아요.

석진: 저는 한국어를 공부하는 외국인들이 이 점을 꼭 알았으면 좋겠어요.

경화: 어떤 점이요?

석진: 유행어를 많이 알면 인기가 많아지고, (맞아요.) 한국 사람들이 너무 좋아해요.

경화: 맞아요. 그래서 개그 프로그램을 많이 봐야 돼요.

석진: 맞아요. 맞아요. “개콘”이라든지, “개그 콘서트” 뭐 그런 프로그램 많죠.

경화: 네. 저는 “개그 콘서트” 굉장히 좋아해요.

석진: 매주 봐요?

경화: 거의 매주 봐요. 동생이, 못 보면 따로 다운 받아 줘요.

석진: 다운로드?

경화: 네.

석진: 아! 혹시 생각나는 유행어 있어요?

경화: “스타가 되고 싶으면 연락해!”

석진: “스타가 되고 싶으면 연락해!”

경화: 그거 너무 재밌었어요. 왜냐하면 그게 전라도 사투리여서 더 친숙해서 더 재밌었어요.

석진: 경화 씨, 고향이...?

경화: 네. 전라도예요.

석진: 전라도!

경화: 네. 저희 어머니도 그래서 굉장히 좋아했어요. 그 유행어.

석진: 그랬구나. 그리고 유행어를 잘 모르면 왠지 “제 또래들보다 좀 뒤쳐진다”는 그런 느낌도 들긴 해요.

경화: 네. 맞아요.

석진: 다른 사람들이 그런 유행어를 하면서 막 웃고 있는데 저 혼자 모르면 상당히 제가 시대에 뒤쳐지는 사람, 아니면 뭐 재미가 없는 사람처럼 느껴졌었어요.

경화: 네. 저도 한동안 개그 콘서트 안 봤거든요. 그런데 요즘에 사투리 쓰는 사람이 표준어 쓰는 것처럼 하는 거 다들 따라 하길래, 저도 챙겨 봤어요. 일부러.

석진: 혹시 그것도 유행어 있어요?

경화: 네. “서울말은 끝만 올리면 되는 거니? 아니, 가끔은 내릴 때도 있어.”

석진: 경화 씨 되게 재밌는데요?

경화: 저 따라하는 거 좋아하는데 별로 제가 하면 사람들이 안 웃더라고요.

석진: 그래도 재밌었어요. 그런데 그건 경상도 사투리를 하는 사람이 해야 더 재밌어요.

경화: 네. 그럼 해 주세요.

석진: “서울말은 끝만 올리면 된다면서?!”

경화: 진짜 허경환하고 비슷하네요.

석진: 네. 허경환이 그 개그 프로에 나오는 그 주인공이죠. (네.) 맞아요. 그리고 또 주의해야 할 점이 있어요. 좀 오래된 유행어를 하면 또 재미없는 사람이 될 수도 있어요.

경화: 아! 네. 맞아요.

석진: 옛날에 “여보세요?” 이 말로 정말 많은 사람들을 웃겼어요. (네.) 되게 크게 유행을 했었는데, 만약에 지금 친구가 전화를 걸었는데, 제가 전화를 받으면서 “여보세요?”하면 되게 싫어할 거예요.

경화: 네. 저도 그 유행어가 굉장히 유행했었다는 사실은 기억하는데, 그걸 지금 들으면 전혀 왜 웃긴지 모르겠어요.

석진: 네. 조심해야 돼요. 그래서 항상 TV를 자주 보는 게 중요하고요. (네.) 이미 지나간 유행어는 안 쓰는 게 (네, 맞아요.) 더 좋을 것 같아요.

경화: 유행어. 말 그대로 유행어니까, 그 때 유행하는 유행어를 써 줘야 돼요. 그래야 웃길 수 있어요.

석진: 해외에는 어떤 유행어가 있는지 되게 궁금해요.

경화: 해외에서 유행어 쓰는 거는 상상이 안 돼요. (그렇죠. 그렇죠.) 네. 외국어로 유행어가 있는 건 상상이 안돼요.

석진: 그래도 저희 TTMIK listener들이, TTMIK 청취자 분들이 아마 써 주실 거예요. 댓글로.

경화: 궁금해요. 알려 주세요.

석진: 지금까지 저와 경화 씨가 유행어에 대해서 이야기를 해 봤는데요. 아까 전에 말 했던 것처럼 외국에도 어떤 유행어가 있는지 되게 궁금해요. 그런 유행어가 있다면 댓글로 써 주시고요. 한국에 있는 어떤 유행어를 또 알고 있는지 그것도 알려 주시면 감사하겠습니다.

경화: 네. 외국인이 들으면 어떤 유행어가 웃긴지 궁금하니까 알려 주세요.

석진: 네. 꼭 코멘트 남겨 주세요. 그리고 마치기 전에 저희 재밌는 유행어 하나 하고 끝내죠. 저부터 할까요? “김 기사~ 운전해~”

경화: 저도 그럼 옛날 걸로. “별들에게 물어 봐!”

석진: 아, 재미없다.

Direct download: ttmik-iyagi-77.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:10pm JST

TTMIK Level 6 Lesson 23 - PDF


Welcome to Part 2 of the Passive Voice lesson! In Part 1, we learned how sentences in the Passive Voice are made in general. In this part, let us take a look at how the passive voice in English and in Korean are different, as well as some more example sentences.

Let’s review a little bit first.

Suffixes for passive voice in Korean
Verb stem + -이/히/리/기
Verb stem + -아/어/여지다

Again, there is no fixed rule for which verb stem should be followed by one of the -이/히/리/기 suffixes and which should be followed by -아/어/여지다. And some verbs have the identical meaning when followed by either of these two.

So for example, “to make” in Korean is 만들다 [man-deul-da]. And when you conjugate this using -아/어/여지다, you have 만들어지다 [man-deu-reo-ji-da] and that’s how you say that something “gets made” or “gets created”.

만들다 = to make
→ 만들어지다 = to be made, to get made

주다 = to give
→ 주어지다 = to be given

자르다 = to cut
→ 잘리다 = to be cut
→ 잘라지다 = to be cut

Another meaning for passive voice sentences in Korean
In Korean, in addition to the meaning of an action “being done”, the meaning of “possibility” or “capability” is also very commonly used with the passive voice sentences. (The basic idea is that, when you do something, if something gets done, it is doable. If something doesn’t get done when you do or try to do it, it’s not doable or not possible to do.)

This meaning of “possibility” or “capability” does not signify YOUR ability or capability so much as it does the general “possibility” of that certain action being done.

Examples
만들다 is “to make”, and when you say 만들어지다, in the original passive voice sense, it would mean “to be made.” But 만들어지다 can not only mean “to be made”, but it can also mean “can be made”.

Ex)
이 핸드폰은 중국에서 만들어져요.
[i haen-deu-po-neun jung-gu-ge-seo man-deu-reo-jyeo-yo.]
= This cellphone is made in China.

케익을 예쁘게 만들고 싶은데, 예쁘게 안 만들어져요.
[ke-i-geul ye-ppeu-ge man-deul-go si-peun-de, ye-ppeu-ge an man-deu-reo-jyeo-yo.]
= I want to make this cake in a pretty shape, but I can’t make it pretty.

(In the 2nd example sentence, you can see that the person is NOT directly saying that he or she CAN’T make a pretty cake, but that the cake DOESN’T get made in a pretty shape.)

More Examples
1. 이거 안 잘라져요.
[i-geo an jal-la-jyeo-yo.]
= This doesn’t get cut.
= I can’t cut it. (more accurate)

2. 안 들려요.
[an deul-lyeo-yo.]
= It is not heard.
= I can’t hear you. (more accurate)

3. 안 보여요.
[an bo-yeo-yo.]
= It is not seen.
= I can’t see it.

하다 vs 되다
Since the passive voice form represents “possibility” or “capability”, the passive voice form of 하다, which is 되다, takes the meaning of “can”.

하다 = to do (active voice)
되다 = to be done, to get done (passive voice)

되다 = can be done, can do (possibility/capability)

Ex)
이거 안 돼요.
[i-geo an dwae-yo.]
= This doesn’t get done.
= I can’t do this. (more accurate)
= I can’t seem to do it. (more accurate)

이해가 안 돼요.
[i-hae-ga an dwae-yo.]
= Understanding is not done.
= It is not understood.
= I can’t understand. (more accurate)
= I don’t understand. (more accurate)

More examples with 되다
And from there, more usages of 되다 are formed.

Originally, 되다 means “to be done” but it can also mean things like:
- can be served
- to be available
- can be spoken
- can be done
- can be made
- can be finished
etc

Ex)
여기 김밥 돼요?
[yeo-gi gim-bap dwae-yo?]
= Do you have/serve kimbap here?

영어가 안 돼서 걱정이에요.
[yeong-eo-ga an dwae-seo geok-jeong-i-e-yo.]
= I’m worried because I can’t speak English.

오늘 안에 돼요?
[o-neul a-ne dwae-yo?]
= Can you finish it today?

So how often does the passive voice take the meaning of “possibility”?
Through Part 1 and 2 of this lesson, we have looked at how the passive voice sentences are formed and used. First, you need to figure out (by being exposed to a lot of Korean sentences) which of the endings is used in the passive voice form. And also, you need to tell from the context of the sentence whether the verb is used in the original “passive” voice or in the sense of “possibility/capability”.

Often times, though, sentences that would be certainly be in the passive voice are written in the active voice in Korean. This is because, in English, in order to NOT show the subject of a certain action in a sentence, you used the passive voice, but in Korean, you can easily drop the subject, so you don’t have to worry about it as much.

For example, when you say “this was made in Korea”, who are you referring to? Who made it? Do you know? Probably not. Therefore, in English, you just say that “it was made in Korea”. But in Korean, you don’t have to worry about the subject of the verb, so you can just use the active voice form and say 한국에서 만든 거예요. or 한국에서 만들었어요. In these two sentences, the verbs are in the active voice, but no one asks “so who made it?” and understands it as the same meaning as “it was made (by somebody) in Korea”.

Direct download: ttmik-l6l23.pdf
Category:PDF -- posted at: 4:18pm JST

TTMIK Level 6 Lesson 23


Welcome to Part 2 of the Passive Voice lesson! In Part 1, we learned how sentences in the Passive Voice are made in general. In this part, let us take a look at how the passive voice in English and in Korean are different, as well as some more example sentences.

Let’s review a little bit first.

Suffixes for passive voice in Korean
Verb stem + -이/히/리/기
Verb stem + -아/어/여지다

Again, there is no fixed rule for which verb stem should be followed by one of the -이/히/리/기 suffixes and which should be followed by -아/어/여지다. And some verbs have the identical meaning when followed by either of these two.

So for example, “to make” in Korean is 만들다 [man-deul-da]. And when you conjugate this using -아/어/여지다, you have 만들어지다 [man-deu-reo-ji-da] and that’s how you say that something “gets made” or “gets created”.

만들다 = to make
→ 만들어지다 = to be made, to get made

주다 = to give
→ 주어지다 = to be given

자르다 = to cut
→ 잘리다 = to be cut
→ 잘라지다 = to be cut

Another meaning for passive voice sentences in Korean
In Korean, in addition to the meaning of an action “being done”, the meaning of “possibility” or “capability” is also very commonly used with the passive voice sentences. (The basic idea is that, when you do something, if something gets done, it is doable. If something doesn’t get done when you do or try to do it, it’s not doable or not possible to do.)

This meaning of “possibility” or “capability” does not signify YOUR ability or capability so much as it does the general “possibility” of that certain action being done.

Examples
만들다 is “to make”, and when you say 만들어지다, in the original passive voice sense, it would mean “to be made.” But 만들어지다 can not only mean “to be made”, but it can also mean “can be made”.

Ex)
이 핸드폰은 중국에서 만들어져요.
[i haen-deu-po-neun jung-gu-ge-seo man-deu-reo-jyeo-yo.]
= This cellphone is made in China.

케익을 예쁘게 만들고 싶은데, 예쁘게 안 만들어져요.
[ke-i-geul ye-ppeu-ge man-deul-go si-peun-de, ye-ppeu-ge an man-deu-reo-jyeo-yo.]
= I want to make this cake in a pretty shape, but I can’t make it pretty.

(In the 2nd example sentence, you can see that the person is NOT directly saying that he or she CAN’T make a pretty cake, but that the cake DOESN’T get made in a pretty shape.)

More Examples
1. 이거 안 잘라져요.
[i-geo an jal-la-jyeo-yo.]
= This doesn’t get cut.
= I can’t cut it. (more accurate)

2. 안 들려요.
[an deul-lyeo-yo.]
= It is not heard.
= I can’t hear you. (more accurate)

3. 안 보여요.
[an bo-yeo-yo.]
= It is not seen.
= I can’t see it.

하다 vs 되다
Since the passive voice form represents “possibility” or “capability”, the passive voice form of 하다, which is 되다, takes the meaning of “can”.

하다 = to do (active voice)
되다 = to be done, to get done (passive voice)

되다 = can be done, can do (possibility/capability)

Ex)
이거 안 돼요.
[i-geo an dwae-yo.]
= This doesn’t get done.
= I can’t do this. (more accurate)
= I can’t seem to do it. (more accurate)

이해가 안 돼요.
[i-hae-ga an dwae-yo.]
= Understanding is not done.
= It is not understood.
= I can’t understand. (more accurate)
= I don’t understand. (more accurate)

More examples with 되다
And from there, more usages of 되다 are formed.

Originally, 되다 means “to be done” but it can also mean things like:
- can be served
- to be available
- can be spoken
- can be done
- can be made
- can be finished
etc

Ex)
여기 김밥 돼요?
[yeo-gi gim-bap dwae-yo?]
= Do you have/serve kimbap here?

영어가 안 돼서 걱정이에요.
[yeong-eo-ga an dwae-seo geok-jeong-i-e-yo.]
= I’m worried because I can’t speak English.

오늘 안에 돼요?
[o-neul a-ne dwae-yo?]
= Can you finish it today?

So how often does the passive voice take the meaning of “possibility”?
Through Part 1 and 2 of this lesson, we have looked at how the passive voice sentences are formed and used. First, you need to figure out (by being exposed to a lot of Korean sentences) which of the endings is used in the passive voice form. And also, you need to tell from the context of the sentence whether the verb is used in the original “passive” voice or in the sense of “possibility/capability”.

Often times, though, sentences that would be certainly be in the passive voice are written in the active voice in Korean. This is because, in English, in order to NOT show the subject of a certain action in a sentence, you used the passive voice, but in Korean, you can easily drop the subject, so you don’t have to worry about it as much.

For example, when you say “this was made in Korea”, who are you referring to? Who made it? Do you know? Probably not. Therefore, in English, you just say that “it was made in Korea”. But in Korean, you don’t have to worry about the subject of the verb, so you can just use the active voice form and say 한국에서 만든 거예요. or 한국에서 만들었어요. In these two sentences, the verbs are in the active voice, but no one asks “so who made it?” and understands it as the same meaning as “it was made (by somebody) in Korea”.

Direct download: ttmik-l6l23.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 4:16pm JST

This is a practice video for you, using the grammar point introduced in Level 1 Lesson 18 at TalkToMeInKorean. Watch the video try saying everything out loud! Video responses are always highly recommended, and if you have any questions, as always, feel free to leave them in the comment!!

Direct download: Practice_Your_Korean_-_Level_1_Lesson_18.mp4
Category:general -- posted at: 10:11pm JST

TTMIK Level 6 Lesson 22 PDF


Word Builder lessons are designed to help you understand how to expand your vocabulary by learning/understanding some common and basic building blocks of Korean words. The words and letters introduced through Word Builder lessons are not necessarily all Chinese characters, or 한자 [han-ja]. Though many of them are based on Chinese characters, the meanings can be different from modern-day Chinese. Your goal, through these lessons, is to understand how words are formed and remember the keywords in Korean to expand your Korean vocabulary from there.  You certainly don’t have to memorize the Hanja characters, but if you want to, feel free!

Today’s keyword is 무.

These Chinese character for this is 無.

The word 무 is related to “none”, “nothing”, and “non-existence”.

무 (none) + 공해 (pollution) = 무공해 無公害 [mu-gong-hae] = pollution-free, clean

무 (none) + 료 (fee) = 무료 無料 [mu-ryo] = free of charge

무 (none) + 시 (to see) = 무시 無視 [mu-si] = to overlook, to neglect, to disregard

무 (none) + 책임 (responsibility) = 무책임 無責任 [mu-chae-gim] = irresponsibility

무 (none) + 조건 (condition) = 무조건 無條件 [mu-jo-geon] = unconditionally

무 (none) + 죄 (sin, guilt) = 무죄 無罪 [mu-joe] = innocent, not guilty

무 (none) + 능력 (ability) = 무능력 無能力 [mu-neung-ryeok] = incapability, incompetence

무 (none) + 한 (limit) = 무한 無限 [mu-han] = infinite, limitless

무 (none) + 적 (enemy) = 무적 無敵 [mu-jeok] = unbeatable, invincible

무 (none) + 사고 (accident) = 무사고 無事故 [mu-sa-go] = no accident

무 (none) + 관심 (interest) = 무관심 無關心 [mu-gwan-sim] = indifference, showing no interest

무 (none) + 명 (name) = 무명 無名 [mu-myeong] = not popular, unknown

무 (none) + 인 (person) = 무인 無人 [mu-in] = unmanned, uninhabited

Direct download: ttmik-l6l22.pdf
Category:PDF -- posted at: 12:33pm JST