Talk To Me In Korean
The key to learning Korean is staying motivated enough to learn the language. At TalkToMeInKorean.com, we provide you free lessons, fun video shows, and a store section that will keep you motivated and meet your Korean learning needs.

TTMIK Han River Talk

In this Han River Talk video, 석진, 경화 and 효진 went to the bridge between the 선유도 공원 (Seon-yu-do Park) and the 선유도 공원 subway station. Have you been to a park by the Han River? If so, which one have you been to? Also in your opinion, when is the best season for visiting Korea?

Direct download: TTMIK_Han_River_Talk.mp4
Category:general -- posted at: 7:26pm JST

TTMIK Level 6 Lesson 24 - PDF

When you want to emphasize an action or state in English, you either do it by adding more stress to the verb in the intonation, or by adding the word "do" in front of the verb.

Example #1
A: It's not easy.
B: No, it IS easy!

Example #2
A: Why did you not go there?
B: I DID go, but I came back early.

Example #3
A: Do you think you can do it?
B: Well, I COULD do it, but I don't want to do it.

Now in this lesson, let us take a look at how to express these in Korean.

The simplest way to do this is by changing the intonation.

A: 왜 안 했어요? [wae an hae-sseo-yo?] = Why didn't you do it?
B: 했어요! [hae-sseo-yo!] = I DID do it!

The above is when you are simply disagreeing with the other person and presenting a different fact.

But if you want to add some conditions or premises to your sentence and say “I did do it, but...” or “I do like it, but...” you need to use a different verb ending.

Example #1
A: So you didn’t even do it?
B: I did!! I DID do it, but I had some help.

Example #2
A: Can you do it?
B: I COULD do it, but I don’t want to do it.

Now let’s look at how to express these in Korean.

The key is “-기는”. This is the noun form -기 plus the topic marker -는. The topic marker is used to show contrast.

Example #1
갔어요. [ga-sseo-yo.] = I went (there).
→ 가기는 갔어요. [ga-gi-neun ga-sseo-yo.] = I DID go (there) but...
→ 가기는 했어요. [ga-gi-neun hae-sseo-yo.] = I DID go (there) but...
→ 가기는 갔는데, 일찍 왔어요. [ga-gi-neun gat-neun-de, il-jjik wa-sseo-yo.] = I DID go there, but I came back early.
→ 가기는 갈 거예요. [ga-gi-neun gal geo-ye-yo.] = I WILL go, but … ( + other premises )

Example #2
봤어요. [bwa-sseo-yo.] = I saw (it).
→ 보기는 봤어요. [bo-gi-neun bwa-sseo-yo.] = I DID see (it) but ...
→ 보기는 했어요. [bo-gi-neun hae-sseo-yo.] = I DID see (it) but …
→ 보기는 봤는데 기억이 안 나요. [bo-gi-neun bwat-neun-de gi-eo-gi an-na-yo.] = I DID see it, but I don’t remember.

How to say “I COULD do it but ...”
To say that you can do something, you use the structure, -(으)ㄹ 수 있다. And since here, -(으)ㄹ 수 is a NOUN GROUP that literally means “a method for doing something” or “possibility/ability”, you can JUST use the topic marker without having to change it again into the noun form. It’s already a noun.

Example
할 수 있어요. [hal su i-sseo-yo.] = I can do (it).
→ 할 수는 있어요. [hal su-neun i-sseo-yo.] = I COULD do it, but …
→ 할 수는 있는데, 안 하고 싶어요. [hal su-neun it-neun-de, an ha-go si-peo-yo.] = I COULD do it, but I don’t want to.
→ 할 수는 있는데, 조건이 있어요. [hal su-neun it-neun-de, jo-geo-ni i-sseo-yo.] = I COULD do it, but there’s a condition.

More Sample Sentences
1. 어제 친구를 만나기는 했는데, 금방 헤어졌어요.
[eo-je chin-gu-reul man-na-gi-neun haet-neun-de, geum-bang he-eo-jyeo-sseo-yo.]
= I DID meet a friend yesterday, but we parted soon.

2. 시간 맞춰서 도착하기는 했는데, 준비를 못 했어요.
[si-gan mat-chwo-seo do-cha-ka-gi-neun haet-neun-de, jun-bi-reul mot hae-sseo-yo.]
= I DID manage to get there on time, but I couldn’t prepare.

3. 읽기는 읽었는데 이해가 안 돼요.
[il-gi-neun il-geot-neun-de i-hae-ga an dwae-yo.]
= I DID read it, but I don’t understand it.

4. 좋기는 좋은데, 너무 비싸요.
[jo-ki-neun jo-eun-de, neo-mu bi-ssa-yo.]
= It IS good, but it’s too expensive.

5. 맛있기는 맛있는데, 좀 짜요.
[ma-sit-gi-neun ma-sit-neun-de, jom jja-yo.]
= It IS delicious, but it’s a bit salty.

Direct download: ttmik-l6l24.pdf
Category:PDF -- posted at: 6:36pm JST

TTMIK Level 6 Lesson 24


When you want to emphasize an action or state in English, you either do it by adding more stress to the verb in the intonation, or by adding the word "do" in front of the verb.

Example #1
A: It's not easy.
B: No, it IS easy!

Example #2
A: Why did you not go there?
B: I DID go, but I came back early.

Example #3
A: Do you think you can do it?
B: Well, I COULD do it, but I don't want to do it.

Now in this lesson, let us take a look at how to express these in Korean.

The simplest way to do this is by changing the intonation.

A: 왜 안 했어요? [wae an hae-sseo-yo?] = Why didn't you do it?
B: 했어요! [hae-sseo-yo!] = I DID do it!

The above is when you are simply disagreeing with the other person and presenting a different fact.

But if you want to add some conditions or premises to your sentence and say “I did do it, but...” or “I do like it, but...” you need to use a different verb ending.

Example #1
A: So you didn’t even do it?
B: I did!! I DID do it, but I had some help.

Example #2
A: Can you do it?
B: I COULD do it, but I don’t want to do it.

Now let’s look at how to express these in Korean.

The key is “-기는”. This is the noun form -기 plus the topic marker -는. The topic marker is used to show contrast.

Example #1
갔어요. [ga-sseo-yo.] = I went (there).
→ 가기는 갔어요. [ga-gi-neun ga-sseo-yo.] = I DID go (there) but...
→ 가기는 했어요. [ga-gi-neun hae-sseo-yo.] = I DID go (there) but...
→ 가기는 갔는데, 일찍 왔어요. [ga-gi-neun gat-neun-de, il-jjik wa-sseo-yo.] = I DID go there, but I came back early.
→ 가기는 갈 거예요. [ga-gi-neun gal geo-ye-yo.] = I WILL go, but … ( + other premises )

Example #2
봤어요. [bwa-sseo-yo.] = I saw (it).
→ 보기는 봤어요. [bo-gi-neun bwa-sseo-yo.] = I DID see (it) but ...
→ 보기는 했어요. [bo-gi-neun hae-sseo-yo.] = I DID see (it) but …
→ 보기는 봤는데 기억이 안 나요. [bo-gi-neun bwat-neun-de gi-eo-gi an-na-yo.] = I DID see it, but I don’t remember.

How to say “I COULD do it but ...”
To say that you can do something, you use the structure, -(으)ㄹ 수 있다. And since here, -(으)ㄹ 수 is a NOUN GROUP that literally means “a method for doing something” or “possibility/ability”, you can JUST use the topic marker without having to change it again into the noun form. It’s already a noun.

Example
할 수 있어요. [hal su i-sseo-yo.] = I can do (it).
→ 할 수는 있어요. [hal su-neun i-sseo-yo.] = I COULD do it, but …
→ 할 수는 있는데, 안 하고 싶어요. [hal su-neun it-neun-de, an ha-go si-peo-yo.] = I COULD do it, but I don’t want to.
→ 할 수는 있는데, 조건이 있어요. [hal su-neun it-neun-de, jo-geo-ni i-sseo-yo.] = I COULD do it, but there’s a condition.

More Sample Sentences
1. 어제 친구를 만나기는 했는데, 금방 헤어졌어요.
[eo-je chin-gu-reul man-na-gi-neun haet-neun-de, geum-bang he-eo-jyeo-sseo-yo.]
= I DID meet a friend yesterday, but we parted soon.

2. 시간 맞춰서 도착하기는 했는데, 준비를 못 했어요.
[si-gan mat-chwo-seo do-cha-ka-gi-neun haet-neun-de, jun-bi-reul mot hae-sseo-yo.]
= I DID manage to get there on time, but I couldn’t prepare.

3. 읽기는 읽었는데 이해가 안 돼요.
[il-gi-neun il-geot-neun-de i-hae-ga an dwae-yo.]
= I DID read it, but I don’t understand it.

4. 좋기는 좋은데, 너무 비싸요.
[jo-ki-neun jo-eun-de, neo-mu bi-ssa-yo.]
= It IS good, but it’s too expensive.

5. 맛있기는 맛있는데, 좀 짜요.
[ma-sit-gi-neun ma-sit-neun-de, jom jja-yo.]
= It IS delicious, but it’s a bit salty.

Direct download: ttmik-l6l24.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:33pm JST

Want to Have a Korean Name?

If you've always wanted to have a Korean name, this is your chance to get one!

You have until the 3rd of October, 2011 to post a video response to this video.

In the video response, make sure you pronounce your name clearly, and also include the spelling of your name both in your language and in the Alphabet.

We will choose a name that either sounds similar to your original name or suits your overall image and give it to you.

Your Korean names will be posted on our site at http://TalkToMeInKorean.com on the 9th of October, 2011, which is the Hangeul Day (한글날).

Thank you sooooo much for always being AWESOME and studying Korean with us!!

http://TalkToMeInKorean.com
http://MyKoreanStore.com

Direct download: 2011hangeuldayevent.mp4
Category:general -- posted at: 5:15pm JST

TTMIK Iyagi #77 - PDF

경화: 안녕하세요. Talk To Me In Korean의 이야기입니다.

석진: 안녕하세요. 경화 씨.

경화: 안녕하세요. 석진 오빠.

석진: 안녕하세요. 여러분.

경화: 안녕하세요. 여러분.

석진: 경화 씨. (네.) 오늘은 특별히 제가 경화 씨를 초대한 게 (네.) 이번 주제가 재밌기 때문이에요. 저는 경화 씨 되게 재밌는 사람이라고 생각했거든요. (네.) 경화 씨는 본인이 재밌다고 생각하세요?

경화: 남을 웃기는 사람은 아닌데, 잘 웃는 사람이라고 생각해요.

석진: 잘 웃는 사람이요?

경화: 네.

석진: 그렇구나. 이번 주제가 유행어예요.

경화: 네.

석진: 유행어 많이 써 보셨어요?

경화: 제가 써 보기 보다는 친구들이 따라할 때 많이 웃었죠.

석진: 주로 웃는 스타일이구나. (네.) 웃기는 그런 사람은 아니고?

경화: 네. 그래서 재밌는 사람을 좋아해요.

석진: 그렇구나. 경화 씨처럼 이제 자주 웃는 사람도 있겠지만, 그냥 여러 친구들 만날 때 안 웃는 사람도 있잖아요.

경화: 맞아요.

석진: 그런 사람들을 웃기려면 여러 방법이 있겠는데, 유행어를 많이 아는 것도 되게 좋은 방법이에요.

경화: 맞아요.

석진: 저는 한국어를 공부하는 외국인들이 이 점을 꼭 알았으면 좋겠어요.

경화: 어떤 점이요?

석진: 유행어를 많이 알면 인기가 많아지고, (맞아요.) 한국 사람들이 너무 좋아해요.

경화: 맞아요. 그래서 개그 프로그램을 많이 봐야 돼요.

석진: 맞아요. 맞아요. “개콘”이라든지, “개그 콘서트” 뭐 그런 프로그램 많죠.

경화: 네. 저는 “개그 콘서트” 굉장히 좋아해요.

석진: 매주 봐요?

경화: 거의 매주 봐요. 동생이, 못 보면 따로 다운 받아 줘요.

석진: 다운로드?

경화: 네.

석진: 아! 혹시 생각나는 유행어 있어요?

경화: “스타가 되고 싶으면 연락해!”

석진: “스타가 되고 싶으면 연락해!”

경화: 그거 너무 재밌었어요. 왜냐하면 그게 전라도 사투리여서 더 친숙해서 더 재밌었어요.

석진: 경화 씨, 고향이...?

경화: 네. 전라도예요.

석진: 전라도!

경화: 네. 저희 어머니도 그래서 굉장히 좋아했어요. 그 유행어.

석진: 그랬구나. 그리고 유행어를 잘 모르면 왠지 “제 또래들보다 좀 뒤쳐진다”는 그런 느낌도 들긴 해요.

경화: 네. 맞아요.

석진: 다른 사람들이 그런 유행어를 하면서 막 웃고 있는데 저 혼자 모르면 상당히 제가 시대에 뒤쳐지는 사람, 아니면 뭐 재미가 없는 사람처럼 느껴졌었어요.

경화: 네. 저도 한동안 개그 콘서트 안 봤거든요. 그런데 요즘에 사투리 쓰는 사람이 표준어 쓰는 것처럼 하는 거 다들 따라 하길래, 저도 챙겨 봤어요. 일부러.

석진: 혹시 그것도 유행어 있어요?

경화: 네. “서울말은 끝만 올리면 되는 거니? 아니, 가끔은 내릴 때도 있어.”

석진: 경화 씨 되게 재밌는데요?

경화: 저 따라하는 거 좋아하는데 별로 제가 하면 사람들이 안 웃더라고요.

석진: 그래도 재밌었어요. 그런데 그건 경상도 사투리를 하는 사람이 해야 더 재밌어요.

경화: 네. 그럼 해 주세요.

석진: “서울말은 끝만 올리면 된다면서?!”

경화: 진짜 허경환하고 비슷하네요.

석진: 네. 허경환이 그 개그 프로에 나오는 그 주인공이죠. (네.) 맞아요. 그리고 또 주의해야 할 점이 있어요. 좀 오래된 유행어를 하면 또 재미없는 사람이 될 수도 있어요.

경화: 아! 네. 맞아요.

석진: 옛날에 “여보세요?” 이 말로 정말 많은 사람들을 웃겼어요. (네.) 되게 크게 유행을 했었는데, 만약에 지금 친구가 전화를 걸었는데, 제가 전화를 받으면서 “여보세요?”하면 되게 싫어할 거예요.

경화: 네. 저도 그 유행어가 굉장히 유행했었다는 사실은 기억하는데, 그걸 지금 들으면 전혀 왜 웃긴지 모르겠어요.

석진: 네. 조심해야 돼요. 그래서 항상 TV를 자주 보는 게 중요하고요. (네.) 이미 지나간 유행어는 안 쓰는 게 (네, 맞아요.) 더 좋을 것 같아요.

경화: 유행어. 말 그대로 유행어니까, 그 때 유행하는 유행어를 써 줘야 돼요. 그래야 웃길 수 있어요.

석진: 해외에는 어떤 유행어가 있는지 되게 궁금해요.

경화: 해외에서 유행어 쓰는 거는 상상이 안 돼요. (그렇죠. 그렇죠.) 네. 외국어로 유행어가 있는 건 상상이 안돼요.

석진: 그래도 저희 TTMIK listener들이, TTMIK 청취자 분들이 아마 써 주실 거예요. 댓글로.

경화: 궁금해요. 알려 주세요.

석진: 지금까지 저와 경화 씨가 유행어에 대해서 이야기를 해 봤는데요. 아까 전에 말 했던 것처럼 외국에도 어떤 유행어가 있는지 되게 궁금해요. 그런 유행어가 있다면 댓글로 써 주시고요. 한국에 있는 어떤 유행어를 또 알고 있는지 그것도 알려 주시면 감사하겠습니다.

경화: 네. 외국인이 들으면 어떤 유행어가 웃긴지 궁금하니까 알려 주세요.

석진: 네. 꼭 코멘트 남겨 주세요. 그리고 마치기 전에 저희 재밌는 유행어 하나 하고 끝내죠. 저부터 할까요? “김 기사~ 운전해~”

경화: 저도 그럼 옛날 걸로. “별들에게 물어 봐!”

석진: 아, 재미없다.

Direct download: iyagi-77.pdf
Category:PDF -- posted at: 3:13pm JST

TTMIK Iyagi #77

경화: 안녕하세요. Talk To Me In Korean의 이야기입니다.

석진: 안녕하세요. 경화 씨.

경화: 안녕하세요. 석진 오빠.

석진: 안녕하세요. 여러분.

경화: 안녕하세요. 여러분.

석진: 경화 씨. (네.) 오늘은 특별히 제가 경화 씨를 초대한 게 (네.) 이번 주제가 재밌기 때문이에요. 저는 경화 씨 되게 재밌는 사람이라고 생각했거든요. (네.) 경화 씨는 본인이 재밌다고 생각하세요?

경화: 남을 웃기는 사람은 아닌데, 잘 웃는 사람이라고 생각해요.

석진: 잘 웃는 사람이요?

경화: 네.

석진: 그렇구나. 이번 주제가 유행어예요.

경화: 네.

석진: 유행어 많이 써 보셨어요?

경화: 제가 써 보기 보다는 친구들이 따라할 때 많이 웃었죠.

석진: 주로 웃는 스타일이구나. (네.) 웃기는 그런 사람은 아니고?

경화: 네. 그래서 재밌는 사람을 좋아해요.

석진: 그렇구나. 경화 씨처럼 이제 자주 웃는 사람도 있겠지만, 그냥 여러 친구들 만날 때 안 웃는 사람도 있잖아요.

경화: 맞아요.

석진: 그런 사람들을 웃기려면 여러 방법이 있겠는데, 유행어를 많이 아는 것도 되게 좋은 방법이에요.

경화: 맞아요.

석진: 저는 한국어를 공부하는 외국인들이 이 점을 꼭 알았으면 좋겠어요.

경화: 어떤 점이요?

석진: 유행어를 많이 알면 인기가 많아지고, (맞아요.) 한국 사람들이 너무 좋아해요.

경화: 맞아요. 그래서 개그 프로그램을 많이 봐야 돼요.

석진: 맞아요. 맞아요. “개콘”이라든지, “개그 콘서트” 뭐 그런 프로그램 많죠.

경화: 네. 저는 “개그 콘서트” 굉장히 좋아해요.

석진: 매주 봐요?

경화: 거의 매주 봐요. 동생이, 못 보면 따로 다운 받아 줘요.

석진: 다운로드?

경화: 네.

석진: 아! 혹시 생각나는 유행어 있어요?

경화: “스타가 되고 싶으면 연락해!”

석진: “스타가 되고 싶으면 연락해!”

경화: 그거 너무 재밌었어요. 왜냐하면 그게 전라도 사투리여서 더 친숙해서 더 재밌었어요.

석진: 경화 씨, 고향이...?

경화: 네. 전라도예요.

석진: 전라도!

경화: 네. 저희 어머니도 그래서 굉장히 좋아했어요. 그 유행어.

석진: 그랬구나. 그리고 유행어를 잘 모르면 왠지 “제 또래들보다 좀 뒤쳐진다”는 그런 느낌도 들긴 해요.

경화: 네. 맞아요.

석진: 다른 사람들이 그런 유행어를 하면서 막 웃고 있는데 저 혼자 모르면 상당히 제가 시대에 뒤쳐지는 사람, 아니면 뭐 재미가 없는 사람처럼 느껴졌었어요.

경화: 네. 저도 한동안 개그 콘서트 안 봤거든요. 그런데 요즘에 사투리 쓰는 사람이 표준어 쓰는 것처럼 하는 거 다들 따라 하길래, 저도 챙겨 봤어요. 일부러.

석진: 혹시 그것도 유행어 있어요?

경화: 네. “서울말은 끝만 올리면 되는 거니? 아니, 가끔은 내릴 때도 있어.”

석진: 경화 씨 되게 재밌는데요?

경화: 저 따라하는 거 좋아하는데 별로 제가 하면 사람들이 안 웃더라고요.

석진: 그래도 재밌었어요. 그런데 그건 경상도 사투리를 하는 사람이 해야 더 재밌어요.

경화: 네. 그럼 해 주세요.

석진: “서울말은 끝만 올리면 된다면서?!”

경화: 진짜 허경환하고 비슷하네요.

석진: 네. 허경환이 그 개그 프로에 나오는 그 주인공이죠. (네.) 맞아요. 그리고 또 주의해야 할 점이 있어요. 좀 오래된 유행어를 하면 또 재미없는 사람이 될 수도 있어요.

경화: 아! 네. 맞아요.

석진: 옛날에 “여보세요?” 이 말로 정말 많은 사람들을 웃겼어요. (네.) 되게 크게 유행을 했었는데, 만약에 지금 친구가 전화를 걸었는데, 제가 전화를 받으면서 “여보세요?”하면 되게 싫어할 거예요.

경화: 네. 저도 그 유행어가 굉장히 유행했었다는 사실은 기억하는데, 그걸 지금 들으면 전혀 왜 웃긴지 모르겠어요.

석진: 네. 조심해야 돼요. 그래서 항상 TV를 자주 보는 게 중요하고요. (네.) 이미 지나간 유행어는 안 쓰는 게 (네, 맞아요.) 더 좋을 것 같아요.

경화: 유행어. 말 그대로 유행어니까, 그 때 유행하는 유행어를 써 줘야 돼요. 그래야 웃길 수 있어요.

석진: 해외에는 어떤 유행어가 있는지 되게 궁금해요.

경화: 해외에서 유행어 쓰는 거는 상상이 안 돼요. (그렇죠. 그렇죠.) 네. 외국어로 유행어가 있는 건 상상이 안돼요.

석진: 그래도 저희 TTMIK listener들이, TTMIK 청취자 분들이 아마 써 주실 거예요. 댓글로.

경화: 궁금해요. 알려 주세요.

석진: 지금까지 저와 경화 씨가 유행어에 대해서 이야기를 해 봤는데요. 아까 전에 말 했던 것처럼 외국에도 어떤 유행어가 있는지 되게 궁금해요. 그런 유행어가 있다면 댓글로 써 주시고요. 한국에 있는 어떤 유행어를 또 알고 있는지 그것도 알려 주시면 감사하겠습니다.

경화: 네. 외국인이 들으면 어떤 유행어가 웃긴지 궁금하니까 알려 주세요.

석진: 네. 꼭 코멘트 남겨 주세요. 그리고 마치기 전에 저희 재밌는 유행어 하나 하고 끝내죠. 저부터 할까요? “김 기사~ 운전해~”

경화: 저도 그럼 옛날 걸로. “별들에게 물어 봐!”

석진: 아, 재미없다.

Direct download: ttmik-iyagi-77.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:10pm JST

TTMIK Level 6 Lesson 23 - PDF


Welcome to Part 2 of the Passive Voice lesson! In Part 1, we learned how sentences in the Passive Voice are made in general. In this part, let us take a look at how the passive voice in English and in Korean are different, as well as some more example sentences.

Let’s review a little bit first.

Suffixes for passive voice in Korean
Verb stem + -이/히/리/기
Verb stem + -아/어/여지다

Again, there is no fixed rule for which verb stem should be followed by one of the -이/히/리/기 suffixes and which should be followed by -아/어/여지다. And some verbs have the identical meaning when followed by either of these two.

So for example, “to make” in Korean is 만들다 [man-deul-da]. And when you conjugate this using -아/어/여지다, you have 만들어지다 [man-deu-reo-ji-da] and that’s how you say that something “gets made” or “gets created”.

만들다 = to make
→ 만들어지다 = to be made, to get made

주다 = to give
→ 주어지다 = to be given

자르다 = to cut
→ 잘리다 = to be cut
→ 잘라지다 = to be cut

Another meaning for passive voice sentences in Korean
In Korean, in addition to the meaning of an action “being done”, the meaning of “possibility” or “capability” is also very commonly used with the passive voice sentences. (The basic idea is that, when you do something, if something gets done, it is doable. If something doesn’t get done when you do or try to do it, it’s not doable or not possible to do.)

This meaning of “possibility” or “capability” does not signify YOUR ability or capability so much as it does the general “possibility” of that certain action being done.

Examples
만들다 is “to make”, and when you say 만들어지다, in the original passive voice sense, it would mean “to be made.” But 만들어지다 can not only mean “to be made”, but it can also mean “can be made”.

Ex)
이 핸드폰은 중국에서 만들어져요.
[i haen-deu-po-neun jung-gu-ge-seo man-deu-reo-jyeo-yo.]
= This cellphone is made in China.

케익을 예쁘게 만들고 싶은데, 예쁘게 안 만들어져요.
[ke-i-geul ye-ppeu-ge man-deul-go si-peun-de, ye-ppeu-ge an man-deu-reo-jyeo-yo.]
= I want to make this cake in a pretty shape, but I can’t make it pretty.

(In the 2nd example sentence, you can see that the person is NOT directly saying that he or she CAN’T make a pretty cake, but that the cake DOESN’T get made in a pretty shape.)

More Examples
1. 이거 안 잘라져요.
[i-geo an jal-la-jyeo-yo.]
= This doesn’t get cut.
= I can’t cut it. (more accurate)

2. 안 들려요.
[an deul-lyeo-yo.]
= It is not heard.
= I can’t hear you. (more accurate)

3. 안 보여요.
[an bo-yeo-yo.]
= It is not seen.
= I can’t see it.

하다 vs 되다
Since the passive voice form represents “possibility” or “capability”, the passive voice form of 하다, which is 되다, takes the meaning of “can”.

하다 = to do (active voice)
되다 = to be done, to get done (passive voice)

되다 = can be done, can do (possibility/capability)

Ex)
이거 안 돼요.
[i-geo an dwae-yo.]
= This doesn’t get done.
= I can’t do this. (more accurate)
= I can’t seem to do it. (more accurate)

이해가 안 돼요.
[i-hae-ga an dwae-yo.]
= Understanding is not done.
= It is not understood.
= I can’t understand. (more accurate)
= I don’t understand. (more accurate)

More examples with 되다
And from there, more usages of 되다 are formed.

Originally, 되다 means “to be done” but it can also mean things like:
- can be served
- to be available
- can be spoken
- can be done
- can be made
- can be finished
etc

Ex)
여기 김밥 돼요?
[yeo-gi gim-bap dwae-yo?]
= Do you have/serve kimbap here?

영어가 안 돼서 걱정이에요.
[yeong-eo-ga an dwae-seo geok-jeong-i-e-yo.]
= I’m worried because I can’t speak English.

오늘 안에 돼요?
[o-neul a-ne dwae-yo?]
= Can you finish it today?

So how often does the passive voice take the meaning of “possibility”?
Through Part 1 and 2 of this lesson, we have looked at how the passive voice sentences are formed and used. First, you need to figure out (by being exposed to a lot of Korean sentences) which of the endings is used in the passive voice form. And also, you need to tell from the context of the sentence whether the verb is used in the original “passive” voice or in the sense of “possibility/capability”.

Often times, though, sentences that would be certainly be in the passive voice are written in the active voice in Korean. This is because, in English, in order to NOT show the subject of a certain action in a sentence, you used the passive voice, but in Korean, you can easily drop the subject, so you don’t have to worry about it as much.

For example, when you say “this was made in Korea”, who are you referring to? Who made it? Do you know? Probably not. Therefore, in English, you just say that “it was made in Korea”. But in Korean, you don’t have to worry about the subject of the verb, so you can just use the active voice form and say 한국에서 만든 거예요. or 한국에서 만들었어요. In these two sentences, the verbs are in the active voice, but no one asks “so who made it?” and understands it as the same meaning as “it was made (by somebody) in Korea”.

Direct download: ttmik-l6l23.pdf
Category:PDF -- posted at: 4:18pm JST

TTMIK Level 6 Lesson 23


Welcome to Part 2 of the Passive Voice lesson! In Part 1, we learned how sentences in the Passive Voice are made in general. In this part, let us take a look at how the passive voice in English and in Korean are different, as well as some more example sentences.

Let’s review a little bit first.

Suffixes for passive voice in Korean
Verb stem + -이/히/리/기
Verb stem + -아/어/여지다

Again, there is no fixed rule for which verb stem should be followed by one of the -이/히/리/기 suffixes and which should be followed by -아/어/여지다. And some verbs have the identical meaning when followed by either of these two.

So for example, “to make” in Korean is 만들다 [man-deul-da]. And when you conjugate this using -아/어/여지다, you have 만들어지다 [man-deu-reo-ji-da] and that’s how you say that something “gets made” or “gets created”.

만들다 = to make
→ 만들어지다 = to be made, to get made

주다 = to give
→ 주어지다 = to be given

자르다 = to cut
→ 잘리다 = to be cut
→ 잘라지다 = to be cut

Another meaning for passive voice sentences in Korean
In Korean, in addition to the meaning of an action “being done”, the meaning of “possibility” or “capability” is also very commonly used with the passive voice sentences. (The basic idea is that, when you do something, if something gets done, it is doable. If something doesn’t get done when you do or try to do it, it’s not doable or not possible to do.)

This meaning of “possibility” or “capability” does not signify YOUR ability or capability so much as it does the general “possibility” of that certain action being done.

Examples
만들다 is “to make”, and when you say 만들어지다, in the original passive voice sense, it would mean “to be made.” But 만들어지다 can not only mean “to be made”, but it can also mean “can be made”.

Ex)
이 핸드폰은 중국에서 만들어져요.
[i haen-deu-po-neun jung-gu-ge-seo man-deu-reo-jyeo-yo.]
= This cellphone is made in China.

케익을 예쁘게 만들고 싶은데, 예쁘게 안 만들어져요.
[ke-i-geul ye-ppeu-ge man-deul-go si-peun-de, ye-ppeu-ge an man-deu-reo-jyeo-yo.]
= I want to make this cake in a pretty shape, but I can’t make it pretty.

(In the 2nd example sentence, you can see that the person is NOT directly saying that he or she CAN’T make a pretty cake, but that the cake DOESN’T get made in a pretty shape.)

More Examples
1. 이거 안 잘라져요.
[i-geo an jal-la-jyeo-yo.]
= This doesn’t get cut.
= I can’t cut it. (more accurate)

2. 안 들려요.
[an deul-lyeo-yo.]
= It is not heard.
= I can’t hear you. (more accurate)

3. 안 보여요.
[an bo-yeo-yo.]
= It is not seen.
= I can’t see it.

하다 vs 되다
Since the passive voice form represents “possibility” or “capability”, the passive voice form of 하다, which is 되다, takes the meaning of “can”.

하다 = to do (active voice)
되다 = to be done, to get done (passive voice)

되다 = can be done, can do (possibility/capability)

Ex)
이거 안 돼요.
[i-geo an dwae-yo.]
= This doesn’t get done.
= I can’t do this. (more accurate)
= I can’t seem to do it. (more accurate)

이해가 안 돼요.
[i-hae-ga an dwae-yo.]
= Understanding is not done.
= It is not understood.
= I can’t understand. (more accurate)
= I don’t understand. (more accurate)

More examples with 되다
And from there, more usages of 되다 are formed.

Originally, 되다 means “to be done” but it can also mean things like:
- can be served
- to be available
- can be spoken
- can be done
- can be made
- can be finished
etc

Ex)
여기 김밥 돼요?
[yeo-gi gim-bap dwae-yo?]
= Do you have/serve kimbap here?

영어가 안 돼서 걱정이에요.
[yeong-eo-ga an dwae-seo geok-jeong-i-e-yo.]
= I’m worried because I can’t speak English.

오늘 안에 돼요?
[o-neul a-ne dwae-yo?]
= Can you finish it today?

So how often does the passive voice take the meaning of “possibility”?
Through Part 1 and 2 of this lesson, we have looked at how the passive voice sentences are formed and used. First, you need to figure out (by being exposed to a lot of Korean sentences) which of the endings is used in the passive voice form. And also, you need to tell from the context of the sentence whether the verb is used in the original “passive” voice or in the sense of “possibility/capability”.

Often times, though, sentences that would be certainly be in the passive voice are written in the active voice in Korean. This is because, in English, in order to NOT show the subject of a certain action in a sentence, you used the passive voice, but in Korean, you can easily drop the subject, so you don’t have to worry about it as much.

For example, when you say “this was made in Korea”, who are you referring to? Who made it? Do you know? Probably not. Therefore, in English, you just say that “it was made in Korea”. But in Korean, you don’t have to worry about the subject of the verb, so you can just use the active voice form and say 한국에서 만든 거예요. or 한국에서 만들었어요. In these two sentences, the verbs are in the active voice, but no one asks “so who made it?” and understands it as the same meaning as “it was made (by somebody) in Korea”.

Direct download: ttmik-l6l23.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 4:16pm JST

This is a practice video for you, using the grammar point introduced in Level 1 Lesson 18 at TalkToMeInKorean. Watch the video try saying everything out loud! Video responses are always highly recommended, and if you have any questions, as always, feel free to leave them in the comment!!

Direct download: Practice_Your_Korean_-_Level_1_Lesson_18.mp4
Category:general -- posted at: 10:11pm JST

TTMIK Level 6 Lesson 22 PDF


Word Builder lessons are designed to help you understand how to expand your vocabulary by learning/understanding some common and basic building blocks of Korean words. The words and letters introduced through Word Builder lessons are not necessarily all Chinese characters, or 한자 [han-ja]. Though many of them are based on Chinese characters, the meanings can be different from modern-day Chinese. Your goal, through these lessons, is to understand how words are formed and remember the keywords in Korean to expand your Korean vocabulary from there.  You certainly don’t have to memorize the Hanja characters, but if you want to, feel free!

Today’s keyword is 무.

These Chinese character for this is 無.

The word 무 is related to “none”, “nothing”, and “non-existence”.

무 (none) + 공해 (pollution) = 무공해 無公害 [mu-gong-hae] = pollution-free, clean

무 (none) + 료 (fee) = 무료 無料 [mu-ryo] = free of charge

무 (none) + 시 (to see) = 무시 無視 [mu-si] = to overlook, to neglect, to disregard

무 (none) + 책임 (responsibility) = 무책임 無責任 [mu-chae-gim] = irresponsibility

무 (none) + 조건 (condition) = 무조건 無條件 [mu-jo-geon] = unconditionally

무 (none) + 죄 (sin, guilt) = 무죄 無罪 [mu-joe] = innocent, not guilty

무 (none) + 능력 (ability) = 무능력 無能力 [mu-neung-ryeok] = incapability, incompetence

무 (none) + 한 (limit) = 무한 無限 [mu-han] = infinite, limitless

무 (none) + 적 (enemy) = 무적 無敵 [mu-jeok] = unbeatable, invincible

무 (none) + 사고 (accident) = 무사고 無事故 [mu-sa-go] = no accident

무 (none) + 관심 (interest) = 무관심 無關心 [mu-gwan-sim] = indifference, showing no interest

무 (none) + 명 (name) = 무명 無名 [mu-myeong] = not popular, unknown

무 (none) + 인 (person) = 무인 無人 [mu-in] = unmanned, uninhabited

Direct download: ttmik-l6l22.pdf
Category:PDF -- posted at: 12:33pm JST

TTMIK Level 6 Lesson 22


Word Builder lessons are designed to help you understand how to expand your vocabulary by learning/understanding some common and basic building blocks of Korean words. The words and letters introduced through Word Builder lessons are not necessarily all Chinese characters, or 한자 [han-ja]. Though many of them are based on Chinese characters, the meanings can be different from modern-day Chinese. Your goal, through these lessons, is to understand how words are formed and remember the keywords in Korean to expand your Korean vocabulary from there.  You certainly don’t have to memorize the Hanja characters, but if you want to, feel free!

Today’s keyword is 무.

These Chinese character for this is 無.

The word 무 is related to “none”, “nothing”, and “non-existence”.

무 (none) + 공해 (pollution) = 무공해 無公害 [mu-gong-hae] = pollution-free, clean

무 (none) + 료 (fee) = 무료 無料 [mu-ryo] = free of charge

무 (none) + 시 (to see) = 무시 無視 [mu-si] = to overlook, to neglect, to disregard

무 (none) + 책임 (responsibility) = 무책임 無責任 [mu-chae-gim] = irresponsibility

무 (none) + 조건 (condition) = 무조건 無條件 [mu-jo-geon] = unconditionally

무 (none) + 죄 (sin, guilt) = 무죄 無罪 [mu-joe] = innocent, not guilty

무 (none) + 능력 (ability) = 무능력 無能力 [mu-neung-ryeok] = incapability, incompetence

무 (none) + 한 (limit) = 무한 無限 [mu-han] = infinite, limitless

무 (none) + 적 (enemy) = 무적 無敵 [mu-jeok] = unbeatable, invincible

무 (none) + 사고 (accident) = 무사고 無事故 [mu-sa-go] = no accident

무 (none) + 관심 (interest) = 무관심 無關心 [mu-gwan-sim] = indifference, showing no interest

무 (none) + 명 (name) = 무명 無名 [mu-myeong] = not popular, unknown

무 (none) + 인 (person) = 무인 無人 [mu-in] = unmanned, uninhabited

Direct download: ttmik-l6l22.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:30pm JST

TTMIK Iyagi #76 PDF

경은: 안녕하세요. Talk To Me In Korean의 이야기입니다.

석진: 안녕하세요. 경은 선배.

경은: 네. 안녕하세요. 석진 씨. (네.) 저 선배인 거죠?

석진: 네. 경은 선배.

경은: 진짜요? (네.) 근데 왜 선배님 대우를 안 해 줘요?

석진: 저는 항상 선배님 대우해 드렸는데, 왜 그러세요.

경은: 왜 그러세요. 진짜.

석진: 네. 오늘 주제가 바로.

경은: 네. 선배, 후배인데요.

석진: 네.

경은: 한국에서는 이렇게 선배라고 하면, 선배 대우를 바라잖아요.

석진: 먼저 선배가 뭔지, 후배가 뭔지, 이걸 알려 드려야 될 것 같아요.

경은: 네. 선배가 뭐고, 후배가 뭐예요?

석진: 선배라고 하면 이제 같은 학교, 같은 단체에서 자기보다 먼저 일찍 들어온 사람. (네. 맞아요.) 그러니까 제가 1학년일 때, 2학년인 사람을 선배라고 부르고.

경은: 나이가 중요한 게 아니죠. 사실은.

석진: 그렇죠. 누가 먼저 들어오느냐.

경은: 맞아요.

석진: 그게 더 중요하죠.

경은: 실력과 나이는 중요하지 않고, 누가 더 먼저 들어왔느냐. 그게 제일 중요해요.

석진: 보통 대학교 안에서 그런 선배, 후배라는 호칭을 많이 쓰고요. (맞아요.) 동아리 안에서도 많이 쓰는 것 같아요.

경은: 고등학교도 동호회 같은 거하면, 선배, 후배 많이 하는 것 같아요.

석진: 그래요?

경은: 네. 고등학교에서도 하고, 대학교에서도 하고, 그리고 회사에서도 “선배님”이라고 호칭을 하는 곳도 있어요.

석진: 그럼 경은 누나는 대학교 다닐 때, 선배님한테 “~선배”라고 불렀어요? 아니면 “~오빠“라고 불렀어요?

경은: 저는 진짜 그냥 “오빠”, “언니”, 이렇게만 불렀어요. 그냥 뭐 “선배님!” 이렇게 한 번 불렀나? 밥 사 달라고 할 때? 밥 사 달라고 할 때, “선배님, 밥 사 주세요.” 이렇게 한 적은 있는데, 뭐 그냥 대화를 하거나 그럴 때는 전부 다 “오빠” 아니면 “언니”라고 불렀던 것 같아요.

석진: 아까 전에 말씀 하셨던 게 밥을 사 준다고 하셨잖아요. 선배라고 하면 자기 후배들을 좀 더 아끼고 그런 마음이 더 크기 때문에, 저도 제가 선배일 때는 후배들한테 밥을 많이 사 줬어요.

경은: 정말요? 그러면 석진 씨가 후배였을 때는 밥을 많이 얻어먹었어요?

석진: 네. 선배님을 보면 한 100m 전에서도 막 달려가서 밥 사 달라고.

경은: 진짜요?

석진: 학교 다닐 때는 돈이 별로 없었잖아요.

경은: 맞아요.

석진: 그래서 그런 선배님들한테 예의를 차리고 깍듯이 대하죠.

경은: 밥 사 달라고 할 때만요?

석진: 꼭 그렇진 않은데요.

경은: 보통 대학교 때는 정말 초반? 3월, 4월, 그 때까지만 밥을 사 줬던 것 같아요.

석진: 어, 그래요? (네.) 저는 1년 내내 사 줬어요.

경은: 어 진짜요? 석진 씨가요? 아니면 석진 씨가 그렇게 얻어먹었어요?

석진: 제가 사 줬어요.

경은: 아, 진짜요? 믿을 수가 없네요.

석진: 저는 좋은 선배였거든요.

경은: 아, 진짜요? 좋은 선배가, 밥 사주는 선배가 좋은 선배예요?

석진: 아마 그 후배들은 그렇게 생각했을 것 같아요.

경은: 근데 선배, 후배하면 한국에서는 또 되게 그런 게 있잖아요. 무섭게 대하고 그리고 벌을 주기도 하고 (맞아요.) 그런 경우도 있잖아요.

석진: 그렇죠. 보통 후배들이 이제 버릇없이 군다거나 아니면, 처음부터 버릇없이 굴지 못하게 하도록 기를 잡는다고 하죠.

경은: 네. 맞아요.

석진: 네. 그래서 별로 이유가 없어요. 혼날 이유가 없는데 갑자기 혼을 내요. “동아리나 여기 학교는 네가 예의를 차려야 되는 곳이니까 앞으로 나한테 잘 해라.”

경은: 맞아요. 그래서 동호회 들어가면, 처음 MT를 가면 항상 그런 시간이 있는 것 같아요. 1학년들을 모아놓고 혼내는 거죠. 너 잘 해라. 너네 잘 해라. 그래서 사실 조금 문제가 되는 곳들도 있잖아요.

석진: 매년 뉴스에서 나오죠. 너무 심하게 하는 곳이 있어서.

경은: 맞아요. 때리기도 하고. “벌을 좀 심하게 준다.” 그렇게 해서 문제가 되기도 해요.

석진: 네. 맞아요. 그런 신고식도 그냥 좋게, 좋게 하면 참 좋은데, (맞아요.) 괜히 그게 좀 거칠게 때리고, 옷을 벗기거나 (맞아요.) 그런 나쁜 방향으로 가서 그게 문제지, 선배 후배 서로 존중하는 그런 자세를 갖는 건 참 좋은 것 같아요.

경은: 맞아요. 한국이 좀 심하죠. 그런 게.

석진: 그런가요?

경은: 네. 그런 것 같아요. 그런 선배 대우를 해 줘야 되고, 대우 뿐 만이 아니라 선배니까 더 친하게 지낼 수 있고. 그런 게 더 심한 것 같아요.

석진: 맞아요. 맞아요. 그런데 그런 선배, 후배라는 관계가 나중에 학교를 졸업하고 나서 사회생활에서 다시 만나면 되게 좋은 것 같아요.

경은: 그렇죠.

석진: 네. 만약에 제가 삼성과 같은 큰 회사에 면접을 보러 갔는데 면접관이 선배예요.

경은: 그러면 안 되죠.

석진: 안 되는데, 그런 기대를 할 수 있는 거죠.

경은: 맞아요. 반갑고. 그렇군요. 알겠어요. 그러면 저희 선배, 후배에 대해서 이야기를 했는데요. 여러분의 나라에서도 이렇게 선배, 후배라는 구분이 딱 지어져 있는지 그리고 선배님들이 밥을 잘 사주는지. 그런 이야기들을 저희한테 해 주세요.

석진: 네. 꼭 해 주세요.

경은: 네. 들어 주셔서 감사합니다.

석진: 감사합니다.

Direct download: iyagi-76.pdf
Category:PDF -- posted at: 11:55am JST

TTMIK Iyagi #76

경은: 안녕하세요. Talk To Me In Korean의 이야기입니다.

석진: 안녕하세요. 경은 선배.

경은: 네. 안녕하세요. 석진 씨. (네.) 저 선배인 거죠?

석진: 네. 경은 선배.

경은: 진짜요? (네.) 근데 왜 선배님 대우를 안 해 줘요?

석진: 저는 항상 선배님 대우해 드렸는데, 왜 그러세요.

경은: 왜 그러세요. 진짜.

석진: 네. 오늘 주제가 바로.

경은: 네. 선배, 후배인데요.

석진: 네.

경은: 한국에서는 이렇게 선배라고 하면, 선배 대우를 바라잖아요.

석진: 먼저 선배가 뭔지, 후배가 뭔지, 이걸 알려 드려야 될 것 같아요.

경은: 네. 선배가 뭐고, 후배가 뭐예요?

석진: 선배라고 하면 이제 같은 학교, 같은 단체에서 자기보다 먼저 일찍 들어온 사람. (네. 맞아요.) 그러니까 제가 1학년일 때, 2학년인 사람을 선배라고 부르고.

경은: 나이가 중요한 게 아니죠. 사실은.

석진: 그렇죠. 누가 먼저 들어오느냐.

경은: 맞아요.

석진: 그게 더 중요하죠.

경은: 실력과 나이는 중요하지 않고, 누가 더 먼저 들어왔느냐. 그게 제일 중요해요.

석진: 보통 대학교 안에서 그런 선배, 후배라는 호칭을 많이 쓰고요. (맞아요.) 동아리 안에서도 많이 쓰는 것 같아요.

경은: 고등학교도 동호회 같은 거하면, 선배, 후배 많이 하는 것 같아요.

석진: 그래요?

경은: 네. 고등학교에서도 하고, 대학교에서도 하고, 그리고 회사에서도 “선배님”이라고 호칭을 하는 곳도 있어요.

석진: 그럼 경은 누나는 대학교 다닐 때, 선배님한테 “~선배”라고 불렀어요? 아니면 “~오빠“라고 불렀어요?

경은: 저는 진짜 그냥 “오빠”, “언니”, 이렇게만 불렀어요. 그냥 뭐 “선배님!” 이렇게 한 번 불렀나? 밥 사 달라고 할 때? 밥 사 달라고 할 때, “선배님, 밥 사 주세요.” 이렇게 한 적은 있는데, 뭐 그냥 대화를 하거나 그럴 때는 전부 다 “오빠” 아니면 “언니”라고 불렀던 것 같아요.

석진: 아까 전에 말씀 하셨던 게 밥을 사 준다고 하셨잖아요. 선배라고 하면 자기 후배들을 좀 더 아끼고 그런 마음이 더 크기 때문에, 저도 제가 선배일 때는 후배들한테 밥을 많이 사 줬어요.

경은: 정말요? 그러면 석진 씨가 후배였을 때는 밥을 많이 얻어먹었어요?

석진: 네. 선배님을 보면 한 100m 전에서도 막 달려가서 밥 사 달라고.

경은: 진짜요?

석진: 학교 다닐 때는 돈이 별로 없었잖아요.

경은: 맞아요.

석진: 그래서 그런 선배님들한테 예의를 차리고 깍듯이 대하죠.

경은: 밥 사 달라고 할 때만요?

석진: 꼭 그렇진 않은데요.

경은: 보통 대학교 때는 정말 초반? 3월, 4월, 그 때까지만 밥을 사 줬던 것 같아요.

석진: 어, 그래요? (네.) 저는 1년 내내 사 줬어요.

경은: 어 진짜요? 석진 씨가요? 아니면 석진 씨가 그렇게 얻어먹었어요?

석진: 제가 사 줬어요.

경은: 아, 진짜요? 믿을 수가 없네요.

석진: 저는 좋은 선배였거든요.

경은: 아, 진짜요? 좋은 선배가, 밥 사주는 선배가 좋은 선배예요?

석진: 아마 그 후배들은 그렇게 생각했을 것 같아요.

경은: 근데 선배, 후배하면 한국에서는 또 되게 그런 게 있잖아요. 무섭게 대하고 그리고 벌을 주기도 하고 (맞아요.) 그런 경우도 있잖아요.

석진: 그렇죠. 보통 후배들이 이제 버릇없이 군다거나 아니면, 처음부터 버릇없이 굴지 못하게 하도록 기를 잡는다고 하죠.

경은: 네. 맞아요.

석진: 네. 그래서 별로 이유가 없어요. 혼날 이유가 없는데 갑자기 혼을 내요. “동아리나 여기 학교는 네가 예의를 차려야 되는 곳이니까 앞으로 나한테 잘 해라.”

경은: 맞아요. 그래서 동호회 들어가면, 처음 MT를 가면 항상 그런 시간이 있는 것 같아요. 1학년들을 모아놓고 혼내는 거죠. 너 잘 해라. 너네 잘 해라. 그래서 사실 조금 문제가 되는 곳들도 있잖아요.

석진: 매년 뉴스에서 나오죠. 너무 심하게 하는 곳이 있어서.

경은: 맞아요. 때리기도 하고. “벌을 좀 심하게 준다.” 그렇게 해서 문제가 되기도 해요.

석진: 네. 맞아요. 그런 신고식도 그냥 좋게, 좋게 하면 참 좋은데, (맞아요.) 괜히 그게 좀 거칠게 때리고, 옷을 벗기거나 (맞아요.) 그런 나쁜 방향으로 가서 그게 문제지, 선배 후배 서로 존중하는 그런 자세를 갖는 건 참 좋은 것 같아요.

경은: 맞아요. 한국이 좀 심하죠. 그런 게.

석진: 그런가요?

경은: 네. 그런 것 같아요. 그런 선배 대우를 해 줘야 되고, 대우 뿐 만이 아니라 선배니까 더 친하게 지낼 수 있고. 그런 게 더 심한 것 같아요.

석진: 맞아요. 맞아요. 그런데 그런 선배, 후배라는 관계가 나중에 학교를 졸업하고 나서 사회생활에서 다시 만나면 되게 좋은 것 같아요.

경은: 그렇죠.

석진: 네. 만약에 제가 삼성과 같은 큰 회사에 면접을 보러 갔는데 면접관이 선배예요.

경은: 그러면 안 되죠.

석진: 안 되는데, 그런 기대를 할 수 있는 거죠.

경은: 맞아요. 반갑고. 그렇군요. 알겠어요. 그러면 저희 선배, 후배에 대해서 이야기를 했는데요. 여러분의 나라에서도 이렇게 선배, 후배라는 구분이 딱 지어져 있는지 그리고 선배님들이 밥을 잘 사주는지. 그런 이야기들을 저희한테 해 주세요.

석진: 네. 꼭 해 주세요.

경은: 네. 들어 주셔서 감사합니다.

석진: 감사합니다.

Direct download: ttmik-iyagi-76.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:52am JST

TTMIK Level 6 Lesson 21 PDF

TTMIK Level 6 Lesson 21 / Passive Voice - Part 1

In this lesson, we take a look at how to make sentences in the passive voice.

What is Passive Voice?
Passive voice is a form of sentence in which the focus is on the recipient of an action, rather than the subject. For example, when you *make* something, that something is *made* by you. When you recommend a book to someone, the book *is recommended* by you. That is passive voice, and the opposite of passive voice is active voice.

How to make passive voice sentences in Korean
In English, you change the verb into its “past participle” form and add it after the BE verb, but in Korean you need to conjugate the verb in the “passive voice” form by adding a suffix or a verb ending.

Suffixes for passive voice in Korean
Verb stem + -이/히/리/기
Verb stem + -아/어/여지다

Passive voice in English and passive voice in Korean are a little different, since, just by adding one of these suffixes to the verb stem, the “passive voice” verb itself can actually work like a stand-alone active verb in Korean.

Meanings
In English, passive voice sentences are just ‘passive voice’ sentences. But in Korean, the verbs take the meaning of “can/to be possible/to be doable/would” as well. Therefore it’s almost even incorrect to call it the ‘passive voice’ in this case. But in this Part 1, let’s look at the ‘passive voice’ meaning of these verb endings.

Difference between -아/어/여지다 and -이/히/리/기
There is no clear rule about which verb stem should be followed by -아/어/여지다 and which should be followed by -이/히/리/기. Native speakers usually determine which ending to use, based on their previous experience of hearing the words being used.

Conjugation rule #1: Verb stem + -아/어/여지다
In Level 4 Lesson 28, we introduced -아/어/여지다 as the conjugation for changing an adjective into the “to become + adjective” form, but when you use -아/어/여지다 with ACTION verbs, the verbs take the passive voice meaning.

1. Change the verb into the present tense.
2. Drop -(아/어/여)요.
3. Add -(아/어/여)지다.

Example 1
자르다 [ja-reu-da] = to cut

자르다 is a “르 irregular” verb so it’s conjugated to 잘라요 in the present tense. You drop -요 and add -지다, and you have 잘라지다.

자르다 → 잘라지다

Example 2
풀다 [pul-da] = to let loose

풀다 → 풀(어요) → 풀어지다

Example 3
주다 [ju-eo-ji-da] = to give

주다 → 주(어요) → 주어지다

Conjugation rule #2 Verb stem + -이/히/리/기
There is no ‘single’ rule that determines which verb stem or letter is followed by which among 이, 히, 리 and 기, but the general rule is as follows:

(1) 이
When the dictionary form of the verb ends in
-ㅎ다,

이 is added to the verb ending and it is changed to
-ㅎ이다

Ex)
놓다 (to put down) → 놓이다 (to be put down)
쌓다 (to pile up) → 쌓이다 (to be piled up)

(2) 히
When the dictionary form of the verb ends in
-ㄱ다, -ㄷ다 or ㅂ다,

히 is added to the verb ending and it is changed to
-ㄱ히다, ㄷ히다 or ㅂ히다.

Ex)
먹다 (to eat) → 먹히다 (to be eaten)
닫다 (to close) → 닫히다 (to get closed)
잡다 (to catch) → 잡히다 (to get caught)

(3) 리
When the dictionary form of the verb ends in
-ㄹ다,

-리 is added to the verb ending and it is changed to
-ㄹ리다.

Ex)
밀다 (to push) → 밀리다 (to be pushed)

(4) 기
When the dictionary form of the verb ends in
-ㄴ다, ㅁ다, ㅅ다 or ㅊ다

-기 is added to the verb ending and it is changed to
-ㄴ기다, -ㅁ기다, -ㅅ기다 or -ㅊ기다

Ex)
안다 (to hug) → 안기다 (to be hugged)
담다 (to put something in a basket/bag) → 담기다 (to be put into a basket/bag)
씻다 (to wash) → 씻기다 (to be washed)
쫓다 (to chase) → 쫓기다 (to be chased)


-이/히/리/기 + -아/어/여지다 (Double Passive Voice)
Sometimes, these two types of verb endings are used TOGETHER in one verb.

Ex)
놓다 → 놓이다 → 놓여지다
안다 → 안기다 → 안겨지다

There is no ‘standard’ explanation for this, but this is most likely because people want to clarify and emphasize the passive voice of the verb. Some grammarians argue that this ‘double passive voice’ is incorrect, but it is already being widely used.


Passive Voice of 하다 Verbs
하다 verbs are combinations of other nouns and 하다, such as 이용하다 (to use), 연구하다 (to research), etc. In order to change these 하다 verbs into the passive voice, you need to change 하다 to 되다.

이용하다 → 이용되다 (to be used)
연구하다 → 연구되다 (to be researched)

Even for 하다/되다, double passive voice is often used.

이용되다 = 이용되어지다
연구되다 = 연구되어지다


This is Part 1 of the Passive Voice lesson. In Part 2, let us look at how passive voice in Korean takes the meaning of “possibility” or “capability”.

Direct download: ttmik-l6l21.pdf
Category:PDF -- posted at: 5:14pm JST

TTMIK Level 6 Lesson 21

In this lesson, we take a look at how to make sentences in the passive voice.

What is Passive Voice?
Passive voice is a form of sentence in which the focus is on the recipient of an action, rather than the subject. For example, when you *make* something, that something is *made* by you. When you recommend a book to someone, the book *is recommended* by you. That is passive voice, and the opposite of passive voice is active voice.

How to make passive voice sentences in Korean
In English, you change the verb into its “past participle” form and add it after the BE verb, but in Korean you need to conjugate the verb in the “passive voice” form by adding a suffix or a verb ending.

Suffixes for passive voice in Korean
Verb stem + -이/히/리/기
Verb stem + -아/어/여지다

Passive voice in English and passive voice in Korean are a little different, since, just by adding one of these suffixes to the verb stem, the “passive voice” verb itself can actually work like a stand-alone active verb in Korean.

Meanings
In English, passive voice sentences are just ‘passive voice’ sentences. But in Korean, the verbs take the meaning of “can/to be possible/to be doable/would” as well. Therefore it’s almost even incorrect to call it the ‘passive voice’ in this case. But in this Part 1, let’s look at the ‘passive voice’ meaning of these verb endings.
Difference between -아/어/여지다 and -이/히/리/기
There is no clear rule about which verb stem should be followed by -아/어/여지다 and which should be followed by -이/히/리/기. Native speakers usually determine which ending to use, based on their previous experience of hearing the words being used.

Conjugation rule #1: Verb stem + -아/어/여지다
In Level 4 Lesson 28, we introduced -아/어/여지다 as the conjugation for changing an adjective into the “to become + adjective” form, but when you use -아/어/여지다 with ACTION verbs, the verbs take the passive voice meaning.

1. Change the verb into the present tense.
2. Drop -(아/어/여)요.
3. Add -(아/어/여)지다.

Example 1
자르다 [ja-reu-da] = to cut

자르다 is a “르 irregular” verb so it’s conjugated to 잘라요 in the present tense. You drop -요 and add -지다, and you have 잘라지다.

자르다 → 잘라지다

Example 2
풀다 [pul-da] = to let loose

풀다 → 풀(어요) → 풀어지다
Example 3
주다 [ju-eo-ji-da] = to give

주다 → 주(어요) → 주어지다

Conjugation rule #2 Verb stem + -이/히/리/기
There is no ‘single’ rule that determines which verb stem or letter is followed by which among 이, 히, 리 and 기, but the general rule is as follows:

(1) 이
When the dictionary form of the verb ends in
-ㅎ다,

이 is added to the verb ending and it is changed to
-ㅎ이다

Ex)
놓다 (to put down) → 놓이다 (to be put down)
쌓다 (to pile up) → 쌓이다 (to be piled up)

(2) 히
When the dictionary form of the verb ends in
-ㄱ다, -ㄷ다 or ㅂ다,

히 is added to the verb ending and it is changed to
-ㄱ히다, ㄷ히다 or ㅂ히다.
Ex)
먹다 (to eat) → 먹히다 (to be eaten)
닫다 (to close) → 닫히다 (to get closed)
잡다 (to catch) → 잡히다 (to get caught)

(3) 리
When the dictionary form of the verb ends in
-ㄹ다,

-리 is added to the verb ending and it is changed to
-ㄹ리다.

Ex)
밀다 (to push) → 밀리다 (to be pushed)

(4) 기
When the dictionary form of the verb ends in
-ㄴ다, ㅁ다, ㅅ다 or ㅊ다

-기 is added to the verb ending and it is changed to
-ㄴ기다, -ㅁ기다, -ㅅ기다 or -ㅊ기다

Ex)
안다 (to hug) → 안기다 (to be hugged)
담다 (to put something in a basket/bag) → 담기다 (to be put into a basket/bag)
씻다 (to wash) → 씻기다 (to be washed)
쫓다 (to chase) → 쫓기다 (to be chased)


-이/히/리/기 + -아/어/여지다 (Double Passive Voice)
Sometimes, these two types of verb endings are used TOGETHER in one verb.

Ex)
놓다 → 놓이다 → 놓여지다
안다 → 안기다 → 안겨지다

There is no ‘standard’ explanation for this, but this is most likely because people want to clarify and emphasize the passive voice of the verb. Some grammarians argue that this ‘double passive voice’ is incorrect, but it is already being widely used.


Passive Voice of 하다 Verbs
하다 verbs are combinations of other nouns and 하다, such as 이용하다 (to use), 연구하다 (to research), etc. In order to change these 하다 verbs into the passive voice, you need to change 하다 to 되다.

이용하다 → 이용되다 (to be used)
연구하다 → 연구되다 (to be researched)

Even for 하다/되다, double passive voice is often used.

이용되다 = 이용되어지다
연구되다 = 연구되어지다

This is Part 1 of the Passive Voice lesson. In Part 2, let us look at how passive voice in Korean takes the meaning of “possibility” or “capability”.

Direct download: ttmik-l6l21.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 5:13pm JST

Read below to see the meanings of the slang expressions used in this video!

1. 간지
간지 is originally a Japanese word (Kanji / 感じ) that means "feeling", "style", or "atmosphere". In Korean, however, it is used as an expression for a "cool style" or to describe someone's "attractive look". When you see someone who is very fashionably dressed or has a very cool hair style, you can use this expression.

2. 대박
대박 means "awesome", "great", "killer", or "amazing". It is often used also when you're dumbfounded by a situation, but it can also be used to say "대박나세요" which means "I wish you great success!" This is used to wish someone good luck. The word "대박" is used a lot between friends and can also often be seen on advertisements. It is basically a noun and can be used with several verbs. "대박 + 이다 (to be)" means "to be awesome" and "대박 + 나다 (to come out)" means "to become successful" or "to be a hit (product)". Sometimes, however, 대박 can be used as an adverb, as in "대박 멋있다 (really cool)".


3. 짱나
짱나 is short for "짜증 나" which is used to express annoyance when something does not go as well as you would like it to. When you are upset or annoyed, the emotion can be expressed with the word "짜증". The verb "나다" and its variation, "내다", are used along with "짜증" to give the full effect.

4. 안습
안습 is an internet term that is a combination of "안구", the medical term for eyeball, and "습기" which translates to "moisture" and is usually combined and used with "이다" meaning "to be." It is used in a joking manner to tease someone by saying "you look like you might cry" or "your behavior brings moisture, or tears to my eyes" after a regrettable or a sad situation occurs, much like the American slang use of the word "fail".

5. 초폐인
폐인 means someone who is either very lazy or leads a very unproductive and lazy lifestyle, usually not dressed properly, while not doing much work and not meeting many people. 초 is a word that emphasizes the word 폐인 which means "super" or "very". And even if you are not "living a lazy life", when you are not washed up or dressed well due to fatigue or busy schedule, therefore unstylish, you can describe yourself as a "폐인" or "초폐인". Young Korean students often say that they become 폐인 when they take school exams.

Direct download: Become_a_Korean_Slang_Master_-_Talk_To_Me_In_Korean.mp4
Category:general -- posted at: 10:19am JST

TTMIK Level 6 Lesson 20 PDF

In this series, we focus on how you can use the grammatical rules and expressions that you have learned so far to train yourself to make more Korean sentences more comfortably and more flexibly.

We will start off with THREE key sentences, and practice changing parts of these sentences so that you don’t end up just memorizing the same three sentences. We want you to be able to be as flexible as possible with the Korean sentences you can make.

Key Sentence #1
쇼핑도 할 겸, 친구도 만날 겸, 홍대에 갈 수도 있어요.
[sho-ping-do hal gyeom, chin-gu-do man-nal gyeom, hong-dae-e wa-sseo-yo.]
= I might go to Hongdae, so I could do some shopping as well as meet a friend while I’m here.

Key Sentence #2
내일 다시 오거나, 아니면 다른 사람에게 부탁할게요.
[nae-il da-si o-geo-na, a-ni-myeon da-reun sa-ra-me-ge bu-ta-kal-ge-yo.]
= I will either come again tomorrow or ask someone else.

Key Sentence #3
그러니까, 누구하고 같이 갈 거라고요?
[geu-reo-ni-kka, nu-gu-ha-go ga-chi gal geo-ra-go-yo?]
= So I mean, who did you say you were going to go with?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Expansion & variation practice with key sentence #1
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0. Original Sentence:
쇼핑도 할 겸, 친구도 만날 겸, 홍대에 갈 수도 있어요.
= I might go to Hongdae, so I could do some shopping as well as meet a friend while I’m here.

1.
친구도 만날 겸 = so I could meet a friend as well
공부도 할 겸 = to do some studying (as well as do something else)
인사도 할 겸 = to say hi (to someone while I’m here)
가격도 알아볼 겸 = to check the prices as well (while I’m here doing something else)

2.
홍대에 갈 수도 있어요. = I might go to Hongdae.
친구를 만날 수도 있어요. = I might meet a friend.
제 친구가 알 수도 있어요. = My friend might know.
다시 올 수도 있어요. = I might come back again.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Expansion & variation practice with key sentence #2
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0. Original Sentence:
내일 다시 오거나, 아니면 다른 사람에게 부탁할게요.
= I will either come again tomorrow or ask someone else.

1.
내일 다시 오거나 = come again tomorrow or
친구를 만나거나 = meet a friend or
친구한테 물어보거나 = ask a friend or
여기에서 기다리거나 = wait here or

2.
아니면 다른 사람에게 부탁할게요. = or I will ask someone else.
아니면 나중에 다시 할게요. = or I will do it again later.
아니면 그냥 제가 할게요. = or I will just do it myself.
아니면 여기에 있을 수도 있어요. = or it might be here.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Expansion & variation practice with key sentence #3
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0. Original Sentence:
그러니까, 누구하고 같이 갈 거라고요?
= So I mean, who did you say you were going to go with?

1.
그러니까, 누구하고 갈 거예요? = So, who are you going to go with?
그러니까 이거 뭐예요? = I mean, what is this?
그러니까 혼자 왔다고요? = You mean you came here alone?
그러니까 제가 안 했어요. = What I’m saying is, I didn’t do it.

2.
누구하고 같이 갈 거라고요? = You said you were going to go with whom? / Again, who are you going with?
언제 할 거라고요? = You said you were going to do it when? / Again, when are you going to do it?
이게 뭐라고요? = What did you say this was? / Again, what is this?

Direct download: ttmik-l6l20.pdf
Category:PDF -- posted at: 2:33pm JST

TTMIK Level 6 Lesson 20

In this series, we focus on how you can use the grammatical rules and expressions that you have learned so far to train yourself to make more Korean sentences more comfortably and more flexibly.

We will start off with THREE key sentences, and practice changing parts of these sentences so that you don’t end up just memorizing the same three sentences. We want you to be able to be as flexible as possible with the Korean sentences you can make.

Key Sentence #1
쇼핑도 할 겸, 친구도 만날 겸, 홍대에 갈 수도 있어요.
[sho-ping-do hal gyeom, chin-gu-do man-nal gyeom, hong-dae-e wa-sseo-yo.]
= I might go to Hongdae, so I could do some shopping as well as meet a friend while I’m here.

Key Sentence #2
내일 다시 오거나, 아니면 다른 사람에게 부탁할게요.
[nae-il da-si o-geo-na, a-ni-myeon da-reun sa-ra-me-ge bu-ta-kal-ge-yo.]
= I will either come again tomorrow or ask someone else.

Key Sentence #3
그러니까, 누구하고 같이 갈 거라고요?
[geu-reo-ni-kka, nu-gu-ha-go ga-chi gal geo-ra-go-yo?]
= So I mean, who did you say you were going to go with?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Expansion & variation practice with key sentence #1
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0. Original Sentence:
쇼핑도 할 겸, 친구도 만날 겸, 홍대에 갈 수도 있어요.
= I might go to Hongdae, so I could do some shopping as well as meet a friend while I’m here.

1.
친구도 만날 겸 = so I could meet a friend as well
공부도 할 겸 = to do some studying (as well as do something else)
인사도 할 겸 = to say hi (to someone while I’m here)
가격도 알아볼 겸 = to check the prices as well (while I’m here doing something else)

2.
홍대에 갈 수도 있어요. = I might go to Hongdae.
친구를 만날 수도 있어요. = I might meet a friend.
제 친구가 알 수도 있어요. = My friend might know.
다시 올 수도 있어요. = I might come back again.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Expansion & variation practice with key sentence #2
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0. Original Sentence:
내일 다시 오거나, 아니면 다른 사람에게 부탁할게요.
= I will either come again tomorrow or ask someone else.

1.
내일 다시 오거나 = come again tomorrow or
친구를 만나거나 = meet a friend or
친구한테 물어보거나 = ask a friend or
여기에서 기다리거나 = wait here or

2.
아니면 다른 사람에게 부탁할게요. = or I will ask someone else.
아니면 나중에 다시 할게요. = or I will do it again later.
아니면 그냥 제가 할게요. = or I will just do it myself.
아니면 여기에 있을 수도 있어요. = or it might be here.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Expansion & variation practice with key sentence #3
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0. Original Sentence:
그러니까, 누구하고 같이 갈 거라고요?
= So I mean, who did you say you were going to go with?

1.
그러니까, 누구하고 갈 거예요? = So, who are you going to go with?
그러니까 이거 뭐예요? = I mean, what is this?
그러니까 혼자 왔다고요? = You mean you came here alone?
그러니까 제가 안 했어요. = What I’m saying is, I didn’t do it.

2.
누구하고 같이 갈 거라고요? = You said you were going to go with whom? / Again, who are you going with?
언제 할 거라고요? = You said you were going to do it when? / Again, when are you going to do it?
이게 뭐라고요? = What did you say this was? / Again, what is this?

Direct download: ttmik-l6l20.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 2:33pm JST

TTMIK Iyagi #75 PDF

경은: 안녕하세요. Talk To Me In Korean의 이야기입니다.
석진: 안녕하세요. 경은 누나.
경은: 안녕하세요. 석진 씨.
석진: 안녕하세요. 여러분.
경은: 안녕하세요. 여러분.
석진: 경은 누나. (네.) 오늘 주제가 회식인데요.
경은: 네. 회식이에요.
석진: 네. 제가 정했어요.
경은: 왜요?
석진: 경은 누나, 회식 많이 해 보셨죠?
경은: 그쵸. 저는 회사 다닌 지 오래돼서 회식 굉장히 많이 했죠.
석진: 그래서 제가 생각하기에 경은 누나가 할 말이 되게 많을 것 같았어요.
경은: 그래요? 안 좋은 이야기만 할 텐데.
석진: 그럼, 회식이 뭐죠?
경은: 회사에서 하는 식사? 이런 거예요. 근데 보통 식사가 아니라 보통 술을 마시죠.
석진: 맞아요. 회사 사람들이랑 “더 열심히 일하자”(그렇죠)라는 취지에서 같이 술도 마시고 밥을 먹는 그런 자린데요.
경은: 네. 주로 회사에서 하는 거기 때문에 회사 돈으로 밥을 먹는 거라서, 그건 좋아요.
석진: 네. 너무 너무 좋은 자린데, 밥도 먹고 술도 먹고, 그런데 왜 싫어하시는 거예요?
경은: 사실 지금은 싫어하지 않아요. 지금 저희 Talk To Me In Korean 팀은 너무 좋으니까, 지금 회식을 하면 좋은데, 옛날에 회사를 다닐 때는 너무 싫었어요.
석진: 왜요?
경은: 왜냐하면 회사에서 회식을 하는 이유가 일을 하면서 힘들었으니까 조금 쉬고, 그리고 같이 친해지면서 불만이 있으면 불만도 이야기하고, 그렇게 하라고 회식을 하는 거예요. 사실은. 그렇지만 회식을 가서도 똑같이 부장님, 과장님, 사장님 다한테 다 잘 해야 되고 눈치를 봐야 되고 그래야 되잖아요.
석진: 맞아요.
경은: 그리고 제일 싫은 부분은 술을 억지로 먹여요. 특히 한국 회사들은 그런 곳이 조금 많은 것 같아요. 그래서 술 마시기 싫은데 왜 술 안 마시냐고 그러면서 구박하고. (맞아요.) 그리고 심지어는 뭐 전화도 못 받게 하고 그랬었어요. 저희 회사는.
석진: 아, 집에 가지 말라고.
경은: 네. 집에 가지 말라고 까지는 아닌데, 왜 회식자리에서 전화를 하고 있냐. 잠깐 나가서 화장실에 가서 전화를 하는 것도 싫어하더라고요. 근데 그 과장님은 조금 특이하셨어요.
석진: 저는 얘기만 들어도 되게 싫어요. 지금. (그쵸?) 기분이 벌써 싫어지고 있어요.
경은: 석진 씨는 그런 회식 안 해봤어요?
석진: 저는 지금 Talk To Me In Korean 오기 전에 학교에서 일했었어요. 학교에 이런 교수님들과 학생들이 같이 회식 자리를 가지곤 했었거든요. 그런데 그 교수님이 되게 권위적이세요. 아주 유명한 연주자였어요. 학생들도 되게 우러러 보고. 선생님을. (존경하고.) 네. 존경하고. 막 그런 면이 많았었거든요? 그래서 교수님도 이제 학생들한테 이것저것 많이 시켰어요. 제가 국악 대학에 있었거든요? 그래서 국악을 꼭 해야 했었고.
경은: 아, 그래도 그런 거는 좀 괜찮을 것 같아요.
석진: 네. 저는 괜찮았어요.
경은: 네. 어차피 뭐 노래하고 춤추는 걸 좋아하는 분들이 모인 거잖아요. 그래서 그런 건 재밌을 것 같은데.
석진: 단 한 가지 안 좋은 점이 (네.) 그 교수님이 되게 늦게까지 술을 마시고, 노래방에 가고, 그렇게 이제 재밌게 노셨는데
경은: 집에 갈 수가 없군요.
석진: 네. 집에 갈 수가 없었어요. 저는 술이 취했고, 배도 부르고, 빨리 집에 가고 싶은데 갈 수가 없는 분위기예요.
경은: 눈치 보이고 또.
석진: 맞아요. 맞아요.
경은: 가면은 다음 날 욕먹잖아요.
석진: 그럼요.
경은: 그리고 저 회사 다닐 때 회식을 하면 술을 엄청 많이 먹인다고 했잖아요. 근데 그 다음 날 지각을 하면 정말 많이 혼나요. (와!) 회식을 할 때 보통 금요일 날 하지는 않아요. 금요일 날은 약속이 있고 그러니까 회사에서 조금 배려를 해주거든요. 그러면 화요일이나 수요일, 목요일 이렇게 평일에 하면 다음 날 회사를 가야 되잖아요. (네.) 그러면 꼭 높은 사람들, 과장님 부장님들이 굉장히 일찍 나와요. 그리고 지각하는 사람 있으면 혼내요.
석진: 아, 못됐다.
경은: 진짜 못됐죠. 이해할 수가 없어요. 저는.
석진: 회식의 취지는 참 좋은데. (맞아요.) 다른 회사에서는 아마 경은 누나가 겪었던 그런 회식 분위기가 많을 거예요.
경은: 네. 그리고 폭탄주도 많이 먹는다고 하더라고요.
석진: 네. 술을 좋아하시거나 높은 분들한테 아부하기 좋아하시는 분들은 아마 회식 자리 좋아할 수 있을 것 같아요.
경은: 근데 요즘에는 회사 문화가 조금 씩 조금 씩 바뀌어 간다고 하더라고요. 그래서 뭐 영화를 본다든가 아니면 술자리가 아닌 다른 모임을 하려고 노력을 한다고는 하는데 그런 게 뉴스에만 나오는 걸 보면 거의 대부분의 회사는 안 그러는 것 같아요. 제 친구들의 회사들은 다 안 그래요. 술만 많이 마셔요.
석진: 그렇지만 우리 Talk To Me In Korean 회식은 어떻죠?
경은: 저희 회식은 술을 전혀 안 마시죠. 그리고 좋아요? 석진 씨?
석진: 네. 맛있는 거 많이 먹어서 너무 좋아요.
경은: 네. 다행이네요. 그러면 여러분 한국의 회식에 대해서 이야기를 했는데요. 물론 회사마다 정말 다르고요, 회식을 좋아하는 친구들도 있긴 있어요.
석진: 저 같은 사람들은 아마 좋아할 거예요. (맞아요.) 맛있는 거 좋아하는 사람들.
경은: 맞아요. 석진 씨는 회식 좋아하니까요. 네. 그러면 여러분의 나라에서도 이런 회식 문화가 있는 지 저희한테 이야기 해 주세요.
석진: 누나, 우리 언제 회식해요?
경은: 추석 끝나고 할까요?
석진: 아, 네. 알겠습니다. 그럼 여러분 들어 주셔서 감사합니다.
경은: 네. 안녕히 계세요.
석진: 안녕히 계세요.

Direct download: iyagi-75.pdf
Category:PDF -- posted at: 1:00pm JST

TTMIK Iyagi #75

경은: 안녕하세요. Talk To Me In Korean의 이야기입니다.
석진: 안녕하세요. 경은 누나.
경은: 안녕하세요. 석진 씨.
석진: 안녕하세요. 여러분.
경은: 안녕하세요. 여러분.
석진: 경은 누나. (네.) 오늘 주제가 회식인데요.
경은: 네. 회식이에요.
석진: 네. 제가 정했어요.
경은: 왜요?
석진: 경은 누나, 회식 많이 해 보셨죠?
경은: 그쵸. 저는 회사 다닌 지 오래돼서 회식 굉장히 많이 했죠.
석진: 그래서 제가 생각하기에 경은 누나가 할 말이 되게 많을 것 같았어요.
경은: 그래요? 안 좋은 이야기만 할 텐데.
석진: 그럼, 회식이 뭐죠?
경은: 회사에서 하는 식사? 이런 거예요. 근데 보통 식사가 아니라 보통 술을 마시죠.
석진: 맞아요. 회사 사람들이랑 “더 열심히 일하자”(그렇죠)라는 취지에서 같이 술도 마시고 밥을 먹는 그런 자린데요.
경은: 네. 주로 회사에서 하는 거기 때문에 회사 돈으로 밥을 먹는 거라서, 그건 좋아요.
석진: 네. 너무 너무 좋은 자린데, 밥도 먹고 술도 먹고, 그런데 왜 싫어하시는 거예요?
경은: 사실 지금은 싫어하지 않아요. 지금 저희 Talk To Me In Korean 팀은 너무 좋으니까, 지금 회식을 하면 좋은데, 옛날에 회사를 다닐 때는 너무 싫었어요.
석진: 왜요?
경은: 왜냐하면 회사에서 회식을 하는 이유가 일을 하면서 힘들었으니까 조금 쉬고, 그리고 같이 친해지면서 불만이 있으면 불만도 이야기하고, 그렇게 하라고 회식을 하는 거예요. 사실은. 그렇지만 회식을 가서도 똑같이 부장님, 과장님, 사장님 다한테 다 잘 해야 되고 눈치를 봐야 되고 그래야 되잖아요.
석진: 맞아요.
경은: 그리고 제일 싫은 부분은 술을 억지로 먹여요. 특히 한국 회사들은 그런 곳이 조금 많은 것 같아요. 그래서 술 마시기 싫은데 왜 술 안 마시냐고 그러면서 구박하고. (맞아요.) 그리고 심지어는 뭐 전화도 못 받게 하고 그랬었어요. 저희 회사는.
석진: 아, 집에 가지 말라고.
경은: 네. 집에 가지 말라고 까지는 아닌데, 왜 회식자리에서 전화를 하고 있냐. 잠깐 나가서 화장실에 가서 전화를 하는 것도 싫어하더라고요. 근데 그 과장님은 조금 특이하셨어요.
석진: 저는 얘기만 들어도 되게 싫어요. 지금. (그쵸?) 기분이 벌써 싫어지고 있어요.
경은: 석진 씨는 그런 회식 안 해봤어요?
석진: 저는 지금 Talk To Me In Korean 오기 전에 학교에서 일했었어요. 학교에 이런 교수님들과 학생들이 같이 회식 자리를 가지곤 했었거든요. 그런데 그 교수님이 되게 권위적이세요. 아주 유명한 연주자였어요. 학생들도 되게 우러러 보고. 선생님을. (존경하고.) 네. 존경하고. 막 그런 면이 많았었거든요? 그래서 교수님도 이제 학생들한테 이것저것 많이 시켰어요. 제가 국악 대학에 있었거든요? 그래서 국악을 꼭 해야 했었고.
경은: 아, 그래도 그런 거는 좀 괜찮을 것 같아요.
석진: 네. 저는 괜찮았어요.
경은: 네. 어차피 뭐 노래하고 춤추는 걸 좋아하는 분들이 모인 거잖아요. 그래서 그런 건 재밌을 것 같은데.
석진: 단 한 가지 안 좋은 점이 (네.) 그 교수님이 되게 늦게까지 술을 마시고, 노래방에 가고, 그렇게 이제 재밌게 노셨는데
경은: 집에 갈 수가 없군요.
석진: 네. 집에 갈 수가 없었어요. 저는 술이 취했고, 배도 부르고, 빨리 집에 가고 싶은데 갈 수가 없는 분위기예요.
경은: 눈치 보이고 또.
석진: 맞아요. 맞아요.
경은: 가면은 다음 날 욕먹잖아요.
석진: 그럼요.
경은: 그리고 저 회사 다닐 때 회식을 하면 술을 엄청 많이 먹인다고 했잖아요. 근데 그 다음 날 지각을 하면 정말 많이 혼나요. (와!) 회식을 할 때 보통 금요일 날 하지는 않아요. 금요일 날은 약속이 있고 그러니까 회사에서 조금 배려를 해주거든요. 그러면 화요일이나 수요일, 목요일 이렇게 평일에 하면 다음 날 회사를 가야 되잖아요. (네.) 그러면 꼭 높은 사람들, 과장님 부장님들이 굉장히 일찍 나와요. 그리고 지각하는 사람 있으면 혼내요.
석진: 아, 못됐다.
경은: 진짜 못됐죠. 이해할 수가 없어요. 저는.
석진: 회식의 취지는 참 좋은데. (맞아요.) 다른 회사에서는 아마 경은 누나가 겪었던 그런 회식 분위기가 많을 거예요.
경은: 네. 그리고 폭탄주도 많이 먹는다고 하더라고요.
석진: 네. 술을 좋아하시거나 높은 분들한테 아부하기 좋아하시는 분들은 아마 회식 자리 좋아할 수 있을 것 같아요.
경은: 근데 요즘에는 회사 문화가 조금 씩 조금 씩 바뀌어 간다고 하더라고요. 그래서 뭐 영화를 본다든가 아니면 술자리가 아닌 다른 모임을 하려고 노력을 한다고는 하는데 그런 게 뉴스에만 나오는 걸 보면 거의 대부분의 회사는 안 그러는 것 같아요. 제 친구들의 회사들은 다 안 그래요. 술만 많이 마셔요.
석진: 그렇지만 우리 Talk To Me In Korean 회식은 어떻죠?
경은: 저희 회식은 술을 전혀 안 마시죠. 그리고 좋아요? 석진 씨?
석진: 네. 맛있는 거 많이 먹어서 너무 좋아요.
경은: 네. 다행이네요. 그러면 여러분 한국의 회식에 대해서 이야기를 했는데요. 물론 회사마다 정말 다르고요, 회식을 좋아하는 친구들도 있긴 있어요.
석진: 저 같은 사람들은 아마 좋아할 거예요. (맞아요.) 맛있는 거 좋아하는 사람들.
경은: 맞아요. 석진 씨는 회식 좋아하니까요. 네. 그러면 여러분의 나라에서도 이런 회식 문화가 있는 지 저희한테 이야기 해 주세요.
석진: 누나, 우리 언제 회식해요?
경은: 추석 끝나고 할까요?
석진: 아, 네. 알겠습니다. 그럼 여러분 들어 주셔서 감사합니다.
경은: 네. 안녕히 계세요.
석진: 안녕히 계세요.

Direct download: ttmik-iyagi-75.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:00pm JST

TTMIK Level 6 Lesson 19 PDF

TTMIK Level 6 Lesson 19 / -아/어/여지다 Part 2 / to improve, to change, to increase

In Level 4 Lesson 28, we introduced the verb ending -아/어/여지다 and how it is used to express “to become + adjective”.

Examples:
예쁘다 = to be pretty
예뻐지다 = to become pretty

조용하다 = to be silent
조용해지다 = to become silent

But some adjective words (or descriptive verb) are so commonly used in this -아/어/여지다 form that they are almost considered as independent verbs and have a single-word translation in English as well.

#1
달라지다 [dal-la-ji-da]

다르다 [da-reu-da] = to be different
다르 → 달라 + -아지다 = 달라지다 = to change, to become different

Sample Sentences
여기 많이 달라졌어요.
[yeo-gi ma-ni dal-la-jyeo-sseo-yo.]
= This place has changed a lot.

뭔가 달라진 것 같아요.
[mwon-ga dal-la-jin geot ga-ta-yo.]
= I feel like something has changed.

#2
좋아지다 [jo-a-ji-da]

좋다 [jo-ta] = to be good, to be likeable
좋 → 좋 + -아지다 = 좋아지다 = to get better, to improve, to be enhanced, to start to like

Sample Sentences
이 가수가 좋아졌어요.
[i ga-su-ga jo-a-jyeo-sseo-yo.]
= I started to like this singer.
= I like this singer now.

노래 실력이 좋아졌어요.
[no-rae sil-lyeo-gi jo-a-jyeo-sseo-yo.]
= My singing skills have improved.

#3
많아지다 [ma-na-ji-da]

많다 [man-ta] = to be a lot, to be abundant
많 → 많 + -아지다 = 많아지다 = to increase

Sample Sentences
한국으로 여행 오는 사람들이 많아졌어요.
[han-gu-geu-ro yeo-haeng o-neun sa-ram-deu-ri ma-na-jyeo-sseo-yo.]
= The (number of) people who come to Korea for traveling have increased.

학생이 많아졌어요.
[hak-saeng-i ma-na-jyeo-sseo-yo.]
= The students have increase.

#4
없어지다 [eop-seo-ji-da]

없다 [eop-da] = to be not there, to not exist, to not have
없 → 없 + -어지다 = 없어지다 = to disappear

Sample Sentences
제 핸드폰이 없어졌어요.
[je haen-deu-po-ni eop-seo-jyeo-sseo-yo.]
= My cellphone has disappeared.

아까 여기 있었는데 없어졌어요.
[a-kka yeo-gi i-sseot-neun-de eop-seo-jyeo-sseo-yo.]
= It was here earlier but it disappeared.

Direct download: ttmik-l6l19.pdf
Category:PDF -- posted at: 1:00pm JST

TTMIK Level 6 Lesson 19

TTMIK Level 6 Lesson 19 / -아/어/여지다 Part 2 / to improve, to change, to increase

In Level 4 Lesson 28, we introduced the verb ending -아/어/여지다 and how it is used to express “to become + adjective”.

Examples:
예쁘다 = to be pretty
예뻐지다 = to become pretty

조용하다 = to be silent
조용해지다 = to become silent

But some adjective words (or descriptive verb) are so commonly used in this -아/어/여지다 form that they are almost considered as independent verbs and have a single-word translation in English as well.

#1
달라지다 [dal-la-ji-da]

다르다 [da-reu-da] = to be different
다르 → 달라 + -아지다 = 달라지다 = to change, to become different

Sample Sentences
여기 많이 달라졌어요.
[yeo-gi ma-ni dal-la-jyeo-sseo-yo.]
= This place has changed a lot.

뭔가 달라진 것 같아요.
[mwon-ga dal-la-jin geot ga-ta-yo.]
= I feel like something has changed.

#2
좋아지다 [jo-a-ji-da]

좋다 [jo-ta] = to be good, to be likeable
좋 → 좋 + -아지다 = 좋아지다 = to get better, to improve, to be enhanced, to start to like

Sample Sentences
이 가수가 좋아졌어요.
[i ga-su-ga jo-a-jyeo-sseo-yo.]
= I started to like this singer.
= I like this singer now.

노래 실력이 좋아졌어요.
[no-rae sil-lyeo-gi jo-a-jyeo-sseo-yo.]
= My singing skills have improved.

#3
많아지다 [ma-na-ji-da]

많다 [man-ta] = to be a lot, to be abundant
많 → 많 + -아지다 = 많아지다 = to increase

Sample Sentences
한국으로 여행 오는 사람들이 많아졌어요.
[han-gu-geu-ro yeo-haeng o-neun sa-ram-deu-ri ma-na-jyeo-sseo-yo.]
= The (number of) people who come to Korea for traveling have increased.

학생이 많아졌어요.
[hak-saeng-i ma-na-jyeo-sseo-yo.]
= The students have increase.

#4
없어지다 [eop-seo-ji-da]

없다 [eop-da] = to be not there, to not exist, to not have
없 → 없 + -어지다 = 없어지다 = to disappear

Sample Sentences
제 핸드폰이 없어졌어요.
[je haen-deu-po-ni eop-seo-jyeo-sseo-yo.]
= My cellphone has disappeared.

아까 여기 있었는데 없어졌어요.
[a-kka yeo-gi i-sseot-neun-de eop-seo-jyeo-sseo-yo.]
= It was here earlier but it disappeared.

Direct download: ttmik-l6l19.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:00pm JST

This is a practice video for you, using the grammar point introduced in Level 1 Lesson 17 at TalkToMeInKorean. Watch the video try saying everything out loud! Video responses are always highly recommended, and if you have any questions, as always, feel free to leave them in the comment!!

Direct download: Practice_Your_Korean_-_Level_1_Lesson_17_Past_Tense_-_You.mp4
Category:general -- posted at: 12:53am JST

News 19 - 2nd Teaser - Come to Korea for free

Direct download: News_19_-_2nd_Teaser_-_Come_to_Korea_for_free.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:18am JST

TTMIK Level 6 Lesson 18

TTMIK Level 6 Lesson 18 - Or / -거나, -(이)나, 아니면

Welcome back to another TalkToMeInKorean lesson. Sometimes very simple words in English can become something more complicated in Korean and vice versa. Today’s key expression is an example of that. In this lesson, let us learn how to say “or” in Korean.

The word “or” can be used to link nouns, adverbs, adjectives, verbs, or even sentences. You don’t need to use a different expression for all of these different usages in English, but in Korean, depending on what kind of word you are linking, the translations for “or” can be different.

Noun + OR + noun
In order to link two nouns, you need to use -(이)나.

Ex)
공원이나 영화관
[gong-won-i-na yeong-hwa-gwan]
= a park or a movie theater

학생이나 선생님
[hak-saeng-i-na seon-saeng-nim]
= a student or a teacher

여기나 저기
[yeo-gi-na jeo-gi]
= here or there

You can also use the word 아니면, which originally literally means “if not”.

Ex)
- 공원 아니면 영화관
- 학생 아니면 선생님
- 여기 아니면 저기

Verb + OR + verb
Since adjectives are essentially “descriptive verbs” in Korean, adjectives and verbs are linked in the same manner. After verb stems, you need to use -거나.

Ex)
먹거나
[meok-geo-na]
= eat or ...

전화하거나
[jeon-hwa-ha-geo-na]
= make a phone call or ...

집에 가거나
[ji-be ga-geo-na]
= go home or ...

The tense (present, past or future) is expressed through the last verb, so the last verb has to be conjugated accordingly to show the tense of the entire sentence.

Ex)
집에 가거나 친구를 만날 거예요.
[ji-be ga-geo-na chin-gu-reul man-nal geo-ye-yo.]
= I will (either) go home or meet a friend.

Sometimes people add -거나 to all of the sentences (Ex: 집에 가거나, 친구를 만나거나) and in that case, they use the verb 하다 (= to do) to finish the sentence.

Ex)
집에 가거나 친구를 만나거나 할 거예요.

In addition to using -거나 at the end of the sentence, you can add 아니면 as well between the two actions.

Ex)
집에 가거나 아니면 친구를 만날 거예요.

** There are other ways of saying “or” with verbs, such as “-든지" and “-든가" but more on those in future lessons!

Sentence + OR + Sentence
In the previous usages, we’ve seen that -(이)나 is used with nouns and -거나 is used with verbs. When you want to say “or” between two sentences, you simply use 아니면. 아니면 is broken down to “아니다 (= to be not) + -(으)면 (= if)”. 아니면 literally means “if not” or “if that’s not the case”.

Ex)
집에 갈 거예요? 아니면 친구를 만날 거예요?
[ji-be gal geo-ye-yo? a-ni-myeon chin-gu-reul man-nal geo-ye-yo?]
= Are you going to go home? Or are you going to meet a friend?

이거 살 거예요? 아니면 다른 거 살 거예요?
[i-geo sal geo-ye-yo? a-ni-myeon da-reun geo sal geo-ye-yo?]
= Are you going  to buy this? Or are you gong to buy something else?

Direct download: ttmik-l6l18.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 2:43pm JST

TTMIK Level 6 Lesson 18 PDF

TTMIK Level 6 Lesson 18 - Or / -거나, -(이)나, 아니면

Welcome back to another TalkToMeInKorean lesson. Sometimes very simple words in English can become something more complicated in Korean and vice versa. Today’s key expression is an example of that. In this lesson, let us learn how to say “or” in Korean.

The word “or” can be used to link nouns, adverbs, adjectives, verbs, or even sentences. You don’t need to use a different expression for all of these different usages in English, but in Korean, depending on what kind of word you are linking, the translations for “or” can be different.

Noun + OR + noun
In order to link two nouns, you need to use -(이)나.

Ex)
공원이나 영화관
[gong-won-i-na yeong-hwa-gwan]
= a park or a movie theater

학생이나 선생님
[hak-saeng-i-na seon-saeng-nim]
= a student or a teacher

여기나 저기
[yeo-gi-na jeo-gi]
= here or there

You can also use the word 아니면, which originally literally means “if not”.

Ex)
- 공원 아니면 영화관
- 학생 아니면 선생님
- 여기 아니면 저기

Verb + OR + verb
Since adjectives are essentially “descriptive verbs” in Korean, adjectives and verbs are linked in the same manner. After verb stems, you need to use -거나.

Ex)
먹거나
[meok-geo-na]
= eat or ...

전화하거나
[jeon-hwa-ha-geo-na]
= make a phone call or ...

집에 가거나
[ji-be ga-geo-na]
= go home or ...

The tense (present, past or future) is expressed through the last verb, so the last verb has to be conjugated accordingly to show the tense of the entire sentence.

Ex)
집에 가거나 친구를 만날 거예요.
[ji-be ga-geo-na chin-gu-reul man-nal geo-ye-yo.]
= I will (either) go home or meet a friend.

Sometimes people add -거나 to all of the sentences (Ex: 집에 가거나, 친구를 만나거나) and in that case, they use the verb 하다 (= to do) to finish the sentence.

Ex)
집에 가거나 친구를 만나거나 할 거예요.

In addition to using -거나 at the end of the sentence, you can add 아니면 as well between the two actions.

Ex)
집에 가거나 아니면 친구를 만날 거예요.

** There are other ways of saying “or” with verbs, such as “-든지" and “-든가" but more on those in future lessons!

Sentence + OR + Sentence
In the previous usages, we’ve seen that -(이)나 is used with nouns and -거나 is used with verbs. When you want to say “or” between two sentences, you simply use 아니면. 아니면 is broken down to “아니다 (= to be not) + -(으)면 (= if)”. 아니면 literally means “if not” or “if that’s not the case”.

Ex)
집에 갈 거예요? 아니면 친구를 만날 거예요?
[ji-be gal geo-ye-yo? a-ni-myeon chin-gu-reul man-nal geo-ye-yo?]
= Are you going to go home? Or are you going to meet a friend?

이거 살 거예요? 아니면 다른 거 살 거예요?
[i-geo sal geo-ye-yo? a-ni-myeon da-reun geo sal geo-ye-yo?]
= Are you going  to buy this? Or are you gong to buy something else?

Direct download: ttmik-l6l18.pdf
Category:PDF -- posted at: 2:42pm JST

TTMIK Iyagi #74 PDF

석진: 안녕하세요. Talk To Me In Korean의 이야기입니다. 안녕하세요. 여러분.

윤아: 안녕하세요. 여러분.

석진: 안녕하세요. 윤아 씨.

윤아: 안녕하세요. 석진 씨.

석진: 윤아 씨.

윤아: 네.

석진: 이야기에 참여하는 건 이번이 처음이죠?

윤아: 네. 처음이에요.

석진: 네. 어때요?

윤아: 긴장돼요.

석진: 긴장돼요? (네) 긴장 푸시고요. (네) 편안하게 하시면 됩니다.

윤아: 네. 알겠습니다.

석진: 윤아 씨. 이번 주제가 (네) 뭔지 아세요?

윤아: 사투리라고 들었어요.

석진: 사투리.

윤아: 네.

석진: 윤아 씨, 사투리 아직 쓰시죠?

윤아: 안 쓰는데요.

석진: 안 써요?

윤아: 네.

석진: 저처럼요?

윤아: 난감하네요.

석진: 사실 저하고 윤아 씨는 오랫동안 지방에서 살다가, 서울이 아닌 지역에서 살다가 올라왔잖아요.

윤아: 네. 맞아요.

석진: 윤아 씨는 고향이?

윤아: 광주요.

석진: 네. 광주에서, 한 20년 동안?

윤아: 그렇죠. 스무 살 때까지 살았어요.

석진: 네. 저는 고향인 포항에서 저도 한 스무 살 때까지 있다가 올라왔는데요. 저는 사실 사투리 고치기가 많이 힘들어요. 지금도 잘 안 고쳐져요.

윤아: 네. 그런 것 같아요.

석진: 그런데 윤아 씨는 사투리 잘 안 쓰는 것 같아요.

윤아: 사실 저는 많이 고쳤어요.

석진: 어떻게 고쳤어요?

윤아: 어떻게 고쳤는지는 사실 정확히 모르겠는데요. 그냥 시간이 가면서 자연스럽게 더 익숙해진 것 같아요.

석진: 저도 그랬으면 좋겠는데, 저는 많이 힘들어요. 혹시 그런데 사투리 고치는 그런 과정에서 어떤 부분이 제일 힘들었어요?

윤아: 일단 사투리를 고쳤다고 생각해도 (네) 자기가 가지고 있는 고유의 억양? 그런 거는 누구나 남아 있는 것 같아요.

석진: 아, 버릇처럼 그런 사투리 억양이 남아 있으니까?

윤아: 네. 그리고 “사투리를 안 써야지.”라고 신경 쓰고 말할 때랑, 그냥 말할 때랑 좀 다른 것 같아요.

석진: 저도 그래서 친구들한테 놀림 정말 많이 받았어요.

윤아: 어떤 놀림 받았어요?

석진: “너 뭐 먹을래?” 이렇게 친구들이 얘기하잖아요. 원래 사투리로 하면 “고기 먹고 싶다.” 이렇게 얘기하면 되는데 “고기 먹고 싶어요.” 뭐 이렇게. 표준어도 아니고.

윤아: 의식하면 더 이상하게 나오는.

석진: 네. 더 이상하게 대답을 했던 것 같아요.

윤아: 저 같은 경우에는 조금 다른데, 의식을 하면 조금 더 완벽한 표준어를 쓸 수 있는데, 의식을 안 하고 있으면 제 억양이 베어 나오는 거예요. 그게 어려웠어요.

석진: 사실 저는 서울 표준어를 약간 싫어했었어요.

윤아: 왜요?

석진: 제가 있었던 경상도에서는 그런 사투리가 좀 남성적이거든요? (네) 좀 거칠어요. 들으면 무섭고 그래요. 그런데 서울 표준어는 너무 여성적이에요. 너무 여리고 순한 것 같고. 그래서 제가 표준어로 얘기를 하면 왠지 여성적인 그런 느낌이 날까 봐...

윤아: 그런 사람이 되는 것 같아서요?

석진: 네. 네. 네. 윤아 씨는 그런 것 없었어요?

윤아: 저는 그런 이유로 싫어하진 않았던 것 같고, 오히려 표준어를 배운 다음에 제가 사투리를 쓸 때, 오히려 “조금 더 남성적인 사람이 되는 것 같다.”라는 느낌을 받고는 해요. 가끔.

석진: 차라리 서울 표준어가 윤아 씨한테는 더 좋은 거네요? 여성적이게 되니까.

윤아: 그럴 수도 있는데, “표준어가 꼭 더 좋다 사투리가 꼭 더 좋다.” 이런 거는 잘 없는 것 같고요. 처음에는 사투리를 고치려는 의지가 굉장히 강했었는데 이제는 고치고 나니까 사투리를 쓰는 게 더 좋을 때도 많아요. 그래서 편하게 섞어 쓰게 되는 것 같아요.

석진: 저도 섞어서 쓰고 싶어요.

윤아: 언젠가는 그럴 수 있는 날이 올 거예요.

석진: 그럼 혹시 외국인들이 사투리를 배우고 싶어 할까요?

윤아: 궁금해 할 것 같아요.

석진: 그럼, 영화! (네) 영화를 보여주는 것도 되게 좋을 거라고 생각하거든요.

윤아: 아, 영화에서 사투리가 나오는 그런 영화들이요?

석진: 네. 네. 네. 대표적인 영화가 뭐가 있을까요?

윤아: 제일 유명한 거는 “친구”?

석진: 네, “친구”! “친구”라는 영화를 보면 처음부터 끝까지 경상도 사투리만 계속 나오죠.

윤아: 네. 그래서 한 때 많이 유행했었던 것 같아요. 그 말투가.

석진: 혹시 기억나는 것 있으세요?

윤아: “마이 무따 아이가!”

석진: “마이 무따 아이가!”

윤아: 너무 유명하고, 그리고, “니가 가라 하와이.”

석진: “니가 가라 하와이.” 예. 여기서 ‘마이 무따 아이가.’ 이 말은 “많이 먹지 않았니?” 이런 뜻이죠. (네) 충분히 먹었다는 말인데, (네) 아주 무서운 장면에서 나오죠.

윤아: 그렇죠.

석진: 그리고 “니가 가라.” 이 말은 “너나 가.” 이런 뜻이죠.

윤아: 네. 어렵진 않은 것 같아요. 그 말들은.

석진: 네. 어렵진 않을 거예요. 외국인들한테도. 그럼 윤아 씨. 전라도 사투리가 많이 나오는 그런 영화 알고 계세요?

윤아: “목포는 항구다.”라는 영화가 사투리, 전라도 사투리가 많이 나온다고 들었어요. 보셨어요? 석진 씨는?

석진: 저는 봤어요.

윤아: 아, 그래요?

석진: 되게 재밌었어요.

윤아: 거기서 기억에 남는 사투리가 있었어요?

석진: 사실 사투리는 뭐 “아따, ~해 버리구마잉” 뭐 이제 그런 말만 기억나는데. 딱히 기억나는 게 별로 없어요.

윤아: 유명한 대사는 없었군요.

석진: 예. 아, 하나 기억나요. “아따 이 아름다운 거.” 이런 거.

윤아: 여기서 “아따”라는 말의 의미를 청취자 분들이 아실까요?

석진: 뭐 “아이고” 이런 뜻 아니에요?

윤아: 너무 여러 가지 뜻을 가지고 있는 말이라서 한가지로 말하기는 힘들어요. 상황에 따라서 굉장히 의미가 바뀌 거든요. 그게 사투리의 특성이잖아요. (그렇죠) 아마 그 장면에서는 ‘우와!’ 이런 뜻으로 쓰였을 것 같아요.

석진: ‘우와!’ (네) 지금까지 저와 윤아 씨가 사투리에 대해서 얘기를 해봤는데요. 여러분 혹시 사투리에 대해서 궁금하신 점이 있으시다면 저희 TalkToMeInKorean.com에 오셔서 댓글로 알려 주세요. 그리고 마치기 전에 (네) 우리 각자 대표적인 사투리를 한 마디씩 하고 마치는 건 어떨까요.

윤아: 네.

석진: 되게 간단한 거 있어요.

윤아: 뭐예요?

석진: “밥 문나?”

윤아: “밥 문나?”

석진: “밥 먹었니?” 이 뜻이고요. 네 윤아 씨?

윤아: 아, 저는 이거 알려 드릴게요. (네) “잘 가잉!”

석진: “잘 가잉!” 뭔 뜻인지 알겠어요. “잘 가.” 이런 말이죠?

윤아: 네. 맞아요.

석진: 네, 그럼 들어 주셔서 감사합니다.

윤아: 감사합니다.

석진: “밥 문나?”

윤아: “잘 가잉!”

Direct download: iyagi-74.pdf
Category:PDF -- posted at: 12:40pm JST

TTMIK Iyagi #74

석진: 안녕하세요. Talk To Me In Korean의 이야기입니다. 안녕하세요. 여러분.

윤아: 안녕하세요. 여러분.

석진: 안녕하세요. 윤아 씨.

윤아: 안녕하세요. 석진 씨.

석진: 윤아 씨.

윤아: 네.

석진: 이야기에 참여하는 건 이번이 처음이죠?

윤아: 네. 처음이에요.

석진: 네. 어때요?

윤아: 긴장돼요.

석진: 긴장돼요? (네) 긴장 푸시고요. (네) 편안하게 하시면 됩니다.

윤아: 네. 알겠습니다.

석진: 윤아 씨. 이번 주제가 (네) 뭔지 아세요?

윤아: 사투리라고 들었어요.

석진: 사투리.

윤아: 네.

석진: 윤아 씨, 사투리 아직 쓰시죠?

윤아: 안 쓰는데요.

석진: 안 써요?

윤아: 네.

석진: 저처럼요?

윤아: 난감하네요.

석진: 사실 저하고 윤아 씨는 오랫동안 지방에서 살다가, 서울이 아닌 지역에서 살다가 올라왔잖아요.

윤아: 네. 맞아요.

석진: 윤아 씨는 고향이?

윤아: 광주요.

석진: 네. 광주에서, 한 20년 동안?

윤아: 그렇죠. 스무 살 때까지 살았어요.

석진: 네. 저는 고향인 포항에서 저도 한 스무 살 때까지 있다가 올라왔는데요. 저는 사실 사투리 고치기가 많이 힘들어요. 지금도 잘 안 고쳐져요.

윤아: 네. 그런 것 같아요.

석진: 그런데 윤아 씨는 사투리 잘 안 쓰는 것 같아요.

윤아: 사실 저는 많이 고쳤어요.

석진: 어떻게 고쳤어요?

윤아: 어떻게 고쳤는지는 사실 정확히 모르겠는데요. 그냥 시간이 가면서 자연스럽게 더 익숙해진 것 같아요.

석진: 저도 그랬으면 좋겠는데, 저는 많이 힘들어요. 혹시 그런데 사투리 고치는 그런 과정에서 어떤 부분이 제일 힘들었어요?

윤아: 일단 사투리를 고쳤다고 생각해도 (네) 자기가 가지고 있는 고유의 억양? 그런 거는 누구나 남아 있는 것 같아요.

석진: 아, 버릇처럼 그런 사투리 억양이 남아 있으니까?

윤아: 네. 그리고 “사투리를 안 써야지.”라고 신경 쓰고 말할 때랑, 그냥 말할 때랑 좀 다른 것 같아요.

석진: 저도 그래서 친구들한테 놀림 정말 많이 받았어요.

윤아: 어떤 놀림 받았어요?

석진: “너 뭐 먹을래?” 이렇게 친구들이 얘기하잖아요. 원래 사투리로 하면 “고기 먹고 싶다.” 이렇게 얘기하면 되는데 “고기 먹고 싶어요.” 뭐 이렇게. 표준어도 아니고.

윤아: 의식하면 더 이상하게 나오는.

석진: 네. 더 이상하게 대답을 했던 것 같아요.

윤아: 저 같은 경우에는 조금 다른데, 의식을 하면 조금 더 완벽한 표준어를 쓸 수 있는데, 의식을 안 하고 있으면 제 억양이 베어 나오는 거예요. 그게 어려웠어요.

석진: 사실 저는 서울 표준어를 약간 싫어했었어요.

윤아: 왜요?

석진: 제가 있었던 경상도에서는 그런 사투리가 좀 남성적이거든요? (네) 좀 거칠어요. 들으면 무섭고 그래요. 그런데 서울 표준어는 너무 여성적이에요. 너무 여리고 순한 것 같고. 그래서 제가 표준어로 얘기를 하면 왠지 여성적인 그런 느낌이 날까 봐...

윤아: 그런 사람이 되는 것 같아서요?

석진: 네. 네. 네. 윤아 씨는 그런 것 없었어요?

윤아: 저는 그런 이유로 싫어하진 않았던 것 같고, 오히려 표준어를 배운 다음에 제가 사투리를 쓸 때, 오히려 “조금 더 남성적인 사람이 되는 것 같다.”라는 느낌을 받고는 해요. 가끔.

석진: 차라리 서울 표준어가 윤아 씨한테는 더 좋은 거네요? 여성적이게 되니까.

윤아: 그럴 수도 있는데, “표준어가 꼭 더 좋다 사투리가 꼭 더 좋다.” 이런 거는 잘 없는 것 같고요. 처음에는 사투리를 고치려는 의지가 굉장히 강했었는데 이제는 고치고 나니까 사투리를 쓰는 게 더 좋을 때도 많아요. 그래서 편하게 섞어 쓰게 되는 것 같아요.

석진: 저도 섞어서 쓰고 싶어요.

윤아: 언젠가는 그럴 수 있는 날이 올 거예요.

석진: 그럼 혹시 외국인들이 사투리를 배우고 싶어 할까요?

윤아: 궁금해 할 것 같아요.

석진: 그럼, 영화! (네) 영화를 보여주는 것도 되게 좋을 거라고 생각하거든요.

윤아: 아, 영화에서 사투리가 나오는 그런 영화들이요?

석진: 네. 네. 네. 대표적인 영화가 뭐가 있을까요?

윤아: 제일 유명한 거는 “친구”?

석진: 네, “친구”! “친구”라는 영화를 보면 처음부터 끝까지 경상도 사투리만 계속 나오죠.

윤아: 네. 그래서 한 때 많이 유행했었던 것 같아요. 그 말투가.

석진: 혹시 기억나는 것 있으세요?

윤아: “마이 무따 아이가!”

석진: “마이 무따 아이가!”

윤아: 너무 유명하고, 그리고, “니가 가라 하와이.”

석진: “니가 가라 하와이.” 예. 여기서 ‘마이 무따 아이가.’ 이 말은 “많이 먹지 않았니?” 이런 뜻이죠. (네) 충분히 먹었다는 말인데, (네) 아주 무서운 장면에서 나오죠.

윤아: 그렇죠.

석진: 그리고 “니가 가라.” 이 말은 “너나 가.” 이런 뜻이죠.

윤아: 네. 어렵진 않은 것 같아요. 그 말들은.

석진: 네. 어렵진 않을 거예요. 외국인들한테도. 그럼 윤아 씨. 전라도 사투리가 많이 나오는 그런 영화 알고 계세요?

윤아: “목포는 항구다.”라는 영화가 사투리, 전라도 사투리가 많이 나온다고 들었어요. 보셨어요? 석진 씨는?

석진: 저는 봤어요.

윤아: 아, 그래요?

석진: 되게 재밌었어요.

윤아: 거기서 기억에 남는 사투리가 있었어요?

석진: 사실 사투리는 뭐 “아따, ~해 버리구마잉” 뭐 이제 그런 말만 기억나는데. 딱히 기억나는 게 별로 없어요.

윤아: 유명한 대사는 없었군요.

석진: 예. 아, 하나 기억나요. “아따 이 아름다운 거.” 이런 거.

윤아: 여기서 “아따”라는 말의 의미를 청취자 분들이 아실까요?

석진: 뭐 “아이고” 이런 뜻 아니에요?

윤아: 너무 여러 가지 뜻을 가지고 있는 말이라서 한가지로 말하기는 힘들어요. 상황에 따라서 굉장히 의미가 바뀌 거든요. 그게 사투리의 특성이잖아요. (그렇죠) 아마 그 장면에서는 ‘우와!’ 이런 뜻으로 쓰였을 것 같아요.

석진: ‘우와!’ (네) 지금까지 저와 윤아 씨가 사투리에 대해서 얘기를 해봤는데요. 여러분 혹시 사투리에 대해서 궁금하신 점이 있으시다면 저희 TalkToMeInKorean.com에 오셔서 댓글로 알려 주세요. 그리고 마치기 전에 (네) 우리 각자 대표적인 사투리를 한 마디씩 하고 마치는 건 어떨까요.

윤아: 네.

석진: 되게 간단한 거 있어요.

윤아: 뭐예요?

석진: “밥 문나?”

윤아: “밥 문나?”

석진: “밥 먹었니?” 이 뜻이고요. 네 윤아 씨?

윤아: 아, 저는 이거 알려 드릴게요. (네) “잘 가잉!”

석진: “잘 가잉!” 뭔 뜻인지 알겠어요. “잘 가.” 이런 말이죠?

윤아: 네. 맞아요.

석진: 네, 그럼 들어 주셔서 감사합니다.

윤아: 감사합니다.

석진: “밥 문나?”

윤아: “잘 가잉!”

Direct download: ttmik-iyagi-74.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:37pm JST

TTMIK Level 6 Lesson 17 PDF

TTMIK Level 6 Lesson 17 / -거든(요)

In this lesson, we are going to take a look at the commonly used verb ending, -거든(요). It has a very subtle meaning, and when used correctly and appropriately, it can make your Korean sound much more natural and fluent.

Usages of -거든(요)
1. -거든(요) can be used to express a reason or some background explanation for something, except, -거든(요) forms a separate sentence from the sentence expressing a result. Other expressions that can express reasons for something are -아/어/여서, -(으)니까, and -기 때문에, but these are used in the same sentence with the result. However, -거든(요) is mostly added separately to your statement about what happened or will happen.

Ex)
저도 모르겠어요. 저 방금 왔거든요.
[jo-do mo-reu-ge-sseo-yo. jeo bang-geum wat-geo-deun-yo.]
= I don’t know either. I just got here.

내일은 안 바빠요. 오늘 일을 다 끝냈거든요.
[nae-i-reun an ba-ppa-yo. o-neul i-reul da kkeut-naet-geo-deun-yo.]
= I’m not busy tomorrow. (Because) I finished all the work today.

2. -거든(요) can also be used when you are implying that your story is continued. When you mention one thing in a sentence that ends with -거든(요), the other person will expect you to mention another thing that’s related to what you just said in the next sentence.

Ex)
제가 지금 돈이 없거든요. 만원만 빌려 주세요.
[je-ga ji-geum do-ni eop-geo-deun-yo. ma-nwon-man bil-lyeo ju-se-yo.]
= I don’t have any money now. (So...) Please lend me just 10,000 won.

지난 주에 제주도에 갔거든요. 그런데 계속 비가 왔어요.
[ji-nan ju-e je-ju-do-e gat-geo-deun-yo. geu-reon-de gye-sok bi-ga wa-sseo-yo.]
= I went to Jeju Island last week. But it kept raining.

Sample Sentences
1. 제가 지금 좀 바쁘거든요.
[je-ga ji-geum jom ba-ppeu-geo-deun-yo.]
= I’m a little busy now, so...

2. 아까 효진 씨 만났거든요. 그런데 이상한 말을 했어요.
[a-kka hyo-jin ssi man-nat-geo-deun-yo. geu-reon-de i-sang-han ma-reul hae-sseo-yo.]
= I met Hyojin earlier. But she said something strange.

3. 아직 말할 수 없어요. 비밀이거든요.
[a-jik mal-hal su eop-seo-yo. bi-mi-ri-geo-deun-yo.]
= I can’t tell you yet. (Because) it’s a secret.


** Generally, -거든요 is used when you want to soften your speech or express a reason for something indirectly, but sometimes when you are upset, you can use -거든요 as the sentence ending to express the reason that supports or explains your anger.

Ex)
필요 없거든요!
[pi-ryo eop-geo-deun-yo!]
= I don’t need it!

이미 늦었거든요!
[i-mi neu-jeot-geo-deun-yo!]
= It’s already too late!

Direct download: ttmik-l6l17.pdf
Category:PDF -- posted at: 5:11pm JST

TTMIK Level 6 Lesson 17

TTMIK Level 6 Lesson 17 / -거든(요)

In this lesson, we are going to take a look at the commonly used verb ending, -거든(요). It has a very subtle meaning, and when used correctly and appropriately, it can make your Korean sound much more natural and fluent.

Usages of -거든(요)
1. -거든(요) can be used to express a reason or some background explanation for something, except, -거든(요) forms a separate sentence from the sentence expressing a result. Other expressions that can express reasons for something are -아/어/여서, -(으)니까, and -기 때문에, but these are used in the same sentence with the result. However, -거든(요) is mostly added separately to your statement about what happened or will happen.

Ex)
저도 모르겠어요. 저 방금 왔거든요.
[jo-do mo-reu-ge-sseo-yo. jeo bang-geum wat-geo-deun-yo.]
= I don’t know either. I just got here.

내일은 안 바빠요. 오늘 일을 다 끝냈거든요.
[nae-i-reun an ba-ppa-yo. o-neul i-reul da kkeut-naet-geo-deun-yo.]
= I’m not busy tomorrow. (Because) I finished all the work today.

2. -거든(요) can also be used when you are implying that your story is continued. When you mention one thing in a sentence that ends with -거든(요), the other person will expect you to mention another thing that’s related to what you just said in the next sentence.

Ex)
제가 지금 돈이 없거든요. 만원만 빌려 주세요.
[je-ga ji-geum do-ni eop-geo-deun-yo. ma-nwon-man bil-lyeo ju-se-yo.]
= I don’t have any money now. (So...) Please lend me just 10,000 won.

지난 주에 제주도에 갔거든요. 그런데 계속 비가 왔어요.
[ji-nan ju-e je-ju-do-e gat-geo-deun-yo. geu-reon-de gye-sok bi-ga wa-sseo-yo.]
= I went to Jeju Island last week. But it kept raining.

Sample Sentences
1. 제가 지금 좀 바쁘거든요.
[je-ga ji-geum jom ba-ppeu-geo-deun-yo.]
= I’m a little busy now, so...

2. 아까 효진 씨 만났거든요. 그런데 이상한 말을 했어요.
[a-kka hyo-jin ssi man-nat-geo-deun-yo. geu-reon-de i-sang-han ma-reul hae-sseo-yo.]
= I met Hyojin earlier. But she said something strange.

3. 아직 말할 수 없어요. 비밀이거든요.
[a-jik mal-hal su eop-seo-yo. bi-mi-ri-geo-deun-yo.]
= I can’t tell you yet. (Because) it’s a secret.


** Generally, -거든요 is used when you want to soften your speech or express a reason for something indirectly, but sometimes when you are upset, you can use -거든요 as the sentence ending to express the reason that supports or explains your anger.

Ex)
필요 없거든요!
[pi-ryo eop-geo-deun-yo!]
= I don’t need it!

이미 늦었거든요!
[i-mi neu-jeot-geo-deun-yo!]
= It’s already too late!

Direct download: ttmik-l6l17.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 5:08pm JST

TTMIK Level 6 Lesson 16


In this lesson, let us take a look at the suffix -겠-. It is very commonly used in everyday Korean, but often not understood very well by learners, mainly because it has so many different meanings and usages.

Various Usages of -겠-
You can use -겠- to ask someone’s intention, to express what you are going to do, to talk about something that will happen, to show your assumption about something, or to talk about possibilities or capabilities. It is also often used in fixed expressions such as 처음 뵙겠습니다 (= Nice to meet you.) and 잘 먹겠습니다 (= Thank you for the food.).

1. -시겠어요? / -시겠습니까? = “Would you …?” “Would you like to …?”
This usage is only used in very formal Korean. In more casual Korean, you would use -(으)ㄹ래(요)? (Review Level 4 Lesson 2 for this grammar point). The honorific suffix -시- is always used with -겠- in this usage.

Ex)
어디로 가시겠어요?
[eo-di-ro ga-si-ge-sseo-yo?]
= Where would you like to go?

Similar: 어디로 갈래(요)?

2. -겠- (used to express one’s intention) = I’m going to …, I’d like to ...
Mostly used in formal Korean, -겠- can also express one’s intention to do something. In more casual Korean, the same meaning can be expressed through -(으)ㄹ게(요) (Review Level 3 Lesson 6 for this grammar point).

Ex)
제가 하겠습니다.
[je-ga ha-ge-sseum-ni-da]
= I’ll do it.

말하지 않겠습니다.
[ma-ra-ji an-ke-sseum-ni-da]
= I won’t tell you.

3. -겠- (used to express one’s opinion/idea/assumption) = I think, I guess, I assume
This is the most common usage of -겠- in casual and everyday conversation in Korean. You can use -겠- to show your opinion or assumption about something or what will happen, but you also give a nuance that you are somewhat careful with your opinion.

Ex)
아프겠어요.
[a-peu-ge-sseo-yo.]
= That must hurt.

Ex)
이게 좋겠어요.
[i-ge jo-ke-sseo-yo.]
= I think this will be good.

Ex)
늦겠어요.
[neut-ge-sseo-yo.]
= (I think) You’ll be late.

** When you want to express your assumption or ask someone else’s opinion about a possibility or a capability, you can use -겠-.

Ex)
혼자서도 되겠어요?
[hon-ja-seo-do doe-ge-sseo-yo?]
= Do you think you could handle it on your own?

저도 들어가겠네요.
[jeo-do deu-reo-ga-get-ne-yo.]
= Even I would (be able to) fit in.

4. -겠- used in fixed expressions
In addition to the usages above, -겠- is also commonly used in some fixed expressions.

Ex)
알겠습니다.
[al-ge-sseum-ni-da.]
= I got it. I understand.

Ex)
모르겠어요.
[mo-reu-ge-sseo-yo.]
= I don’t get it. I don’t know. I am not sure.

Ex)
힘들어 죽겠어요.
[him-deu-reo juk-ge-sseo-yo.]
= I’m so tired. This is so tough.



Direct download: ttmik-l6l16.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:07pm JST

TTMIK Level 6 Lesson 16  PDF


In this lesson, let us take a look at the suffix -겠-. It is very commonly used in everyday Korean, but often not understood very well by learners, mainly because it has so many different meanings and usages.

Various Usages of -겠-
You can use -겠- to ask someone’s intention, to express what you are going to do, to talk about something that will happen, to show your assumption about something, or to talk about possibilities or capabilities. It is also often used in fixed expressions such as 처음 뵙겠습니다 (= Nice to meet you.) and 잘 먹겠습니다 (= Thank you for the food.).

1. -시겠어요? / -시겠습니까? = “Would you …?” “Would you like to …?”
This usage is only used in very formal Korean. In more casual Korean, you would use -(으)ㄹ래(요)? (Review Level 4 Lesson 2 for this grammar point). The honorific suffix -시- is always used with -겠- in this usage.

Ex)
어디로 가시겠어요?
[eo-di-ro ga-si-ge-sseo-yo?]
= Where would you like to go?

Similar: 어디로 갈래(요)?

2. -겠- (used to express one’s intention) = I’m going to …, I’d like to ...
Mostly used in formal Korean, -겠- can also express one’s intention to do something. In more casual Korean, the same meaning can be expressed through -(으)ㄹ게(요) (Review Level 3 Lesson 6 for this grammar point).

Ex)
제가 하겠습니다.
[je-ga ha-ge-sseum-ni-da]
= I’ll do it.

말하지 않겠습니다.
[ma-ra-ji an-ke-sseum-ni-da]
= I won’t tell you.

3. -겠- (used to express one’s opinion/idea/assumption) = I think, I guess, I assume
This is the most common usage of -겠- in casual and everyday conversation in Korean. You can use -겠- to show your opinion or assumption about something or what will happen, but you also give a nuance that you are somewhat careful with your opinion.

Ex)
아프겠어요.
[a-peu-ge-sseo-yo.]
= That must hurt.

Ex)
이게 좋겠어요.
[i-ge jo-ke-sseo-yo.]
= I think this will be good.

Ex)
늦겠어요.
[neut-ge-sseo-yo.]
= (I think) You’ll be late.

** When you want to express your assumption or ask someone else’s opinion about a possibility or a capability, you can use -겠-.

Ex)
혼자서도 되겠어요?
[hon-ja-seo-do doe-ge-sseo-yo?]
= Do you think you could handle it on your own?

저도 들어가겠네요.
[jeo-do deu-reo-ga-get-ne-yo.]
= Even I would (be able to) fit in.

4. -겠- used in fixed expressions
In addition to the usages above, -겠- is also commonly used in some fixed expressions.

Ex)
알겠습니다.
[al-ge-sseum-ni-da.]
= I got it. I understand.

Ex)
모르겠어요.
[mo-reu-ge-sseo-yo.]
= I don’t get it. I don’t know. I am not sure.

Ex)
힘들어 죽겠어요.
[him-deu-reo juk-ge-sseo-yo.]
= I’m so tired. This is so tough.



Direct download: ttmik-l6l16.pdf
Category:PDF -- posted at: 11:59am JST